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JHMT Highlights

Another ‘eventful year’ of JHMT fundraising and awareness activities to break the silence on #SADS – Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome

Rugby Legends help raise £35,000 at Gleeds’ Charity Dinner

Rugby Legends help raise £35,000 at Gleeds’ Charity Dinner

International property and construction consultancy, Gleeds, is pleased to announce the success of its Rugby Legends Charity Dinner, held last night at the Leicester Tigers Stadium. The event raised in excess of £35,000 for the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) and was attended by three-time Rugby World Cup player, Rory Underwood and Rugby World Cup winning captain, Martin Johnson, who offered insights into their achievements within the sport, with a guest appearance by former England player, Matt Poole.

Monies raised from the sale of around 460 tickets and proceeds from an exclusive auction will go to the JHMT, which was set up to raise awareness of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (SADS) following the tragic and unexpected death of 14 year old Joe Humphries, who died without warning whilst out jogging with a friend. Statistics show that individuals who suffer from a cardiac arrest have a 71% chance of survival if an AED is used within 1-2 minutes compared to the current 10%.

Martin Johnson, patron of the JHMT, said: "I'm proud to support the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust. Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome is something that every parent should be aware of. In their sad loss of Joe, the Humphries family have found amazing strength in launching this Trust in his memory."

The event is just one in a series taking place as part of the Gleeds Global Challenge, an initiative which sees staff raising money for a variety of causes to mark the firm's 130th year in business. So far, teams from the 56 global offices have already exceeded their target of raising a staggering £130,000 in one week, with the current total standing at over £170,000 and benefiting over 81 different charities around the world.

Jon Enever, Gleeds main board director based in Nottingham, went on to say; "I am exceptionally proud of the amount of money raised by Gleeds to date under the Global Challenge banner and I am particularly pleased that in doing so we have been able to make a difference to local charities like the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust. Thank you to everyone who donated and to the rugby stars for lending their support on the evening."

Rory Underwood added: "Thanks go to Gleeds for putting on this event and for a great evening. I am in awe of the strength of Joe's family and was absolutely delighted to see so many people digging deep to raise funds and awareness for this fantastic cause."

The event was attended by many of the key players in the construction and property industry within the Leicester and wider Midlands area, including contractor and main sponsors, Willmott Dixon.

David Ford, business development manager at Willmott Dixon said: "Willmott Dixon has worked very closely with Gleeds on a number of high profile schemes that enhance local communities in Leicester and beyond and we are proud to be supporting the Gleeds Global Challenge through our sponsorship of this charity dinner. The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust is a very worthy organisation and we hope the evening was fruitful for the charity."

November 2015
Ellie Conquers Kilimanjaro and Raises Thousands for Charity

Ellie Conquers Kilimanjaro and Raises Thousands for Charity

A LEICESTERSHIRE teenager has conquered the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in a fund-raising trek that has raised nearly £3,000 for a local charity.

Eighteen-year-old Ellie Allan, from Rothley, undertook the eight-day expedition last month (Oct), in aid of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

Ellie – a Loughborough Endowed Schools student – was a childhood friend of Joe Humphries, the Rothley teenager who collapsed and died from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) while out jogging in October 2012.

Since his death, Joe's friends and family have worked tirelessly to raise awareness of SADS and campaign for a better understanding of sudden, unexpected death in young people.

They set up the Joe Humpries Memorial Trust (JHMT), and have campaigned for compulsory CPR training in schools and defibrillators in schools, community venues and sports clubs.

Ellie said: "I decided to trek Kilimanjaro after my dad said for my 18th birthday present he would take me anywhere in the world. I thought it was something a bit different and worthwhile to do.

"I chose to raise money for the JHMT because I knew Joe well as a child, and because as well as having that personal connection, it's such a worthwhile charity to raise money for.

"I enjoy hiking as a hobby – in 2014, I did the Three Peaks challenge for the JHMT and I really enjoyed it, so I wanted to take on another challenge.

"The best bit of the trip was definitely reaching the summit. After six days of walking with little energy left, seeing the sign at the summit was overwhelming.

"The night before, we had to set off from the campsite at midnight and walk uphill for eight hours in temperatures as low as minus 20 degrees, only stopping every hour for a five-minute break. It was a really good experience, but definitely the hardest thing I've ever done!"

All of the £2,951 Ellie raised will go directly to the JHMT.

Steve Humphries, chair of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and Joe's dad, said: "This is a fantastic personal achievement for Ellie, and we're honoured that she chose to dedicate her trip to Joe.

"Ellie's determination and strength of spirit have taken her all the way to the top of Africa's tallest mountain, and it's these qualities that have also helped her to raise such a fantastic amount for the Trust.

"This is another example of one of the many inspirational young people from Leicester and Leicestershire who are so committed to helping Joe's Trust reduce the incidence of such devastating loss of young lives.

"We'll put the money raised to good use – it will go towards our vital work raising awareness of sudden heart deaths, providing defibrillators and training, and helping to fund young people to reach their goals through our Inspire Awards scheme."

To find out more about the work of the JHMT, visit www.jhmt.otg.uk, follow @JHMTorguk on Twitter or see www.facebook.com/jhmtorguk

Joe's (3rd) Annual Photography Competition 2015 at De Lisle Academy

Joe's (3rd) Annual Photography Competition 2015 at De Lisle Academy

Joe's passion for photography continues to burn brightly in the hearts and minds in of all the staff and talented pupils at De Lisle Academy.

Once again, for the third consecutive year and a record number of entries, it was another another memorable occasion to celebrate the creative photographic talents of students, in memory of Joe.

Hayley Badock from the learning resource department at De Lisle College said:' This year we had 73 entries, more than last year which is brilliant. The response from students has again been overwhelming; the competition is now a huge event in the college year. All entries are currently being exhibited around the college for staff, visitors and students to enjoy.

'Next year will be a special event as we will be theming around the number 18 for what should have been Joe’s 18th year; we will also be running a separate staff photography competition alongside the student’s competition(as so many staff asked if they could enter this year!).'

Thanks to all the staff including Mr Chris Davies, Sarah Ward, Terry Sharp, Hayley Badock and of course all the students who took part to make this another very special event.

Thanks also to Lee Glasgow, professional photographer, for judging the competition

Congratulations to everyone who took part and well done also to this year's winning entries:

1st: Lucy Jones, year 12 - Lucy’s photo was of a bicycle leaning on a fence in the countryside on a summer’s day.

2nd: .Molly Ainge-Hatton, year 12

3rd: Ben Whitmore,year 8

Highly Commended: Vishal Sharma, year 10 Luke Hand, year 8 & Stanislaw Lyson, year 11

Facebook photos of the competition: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.325185984289755.1073741862.157002341108121&type=3

Media Students' Focus on Heart Issues Affecting Young People

Media Students' Focus on Heart Issues Affecting Young People

Media Students' focus on heart issues affecting young people to help JHMT raise awareness of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome #SADS

A group of ( Lower 6th) STUDENTS from Robert Smyth Academy, Market Harborough, presented their media campaign ideas, to help JHMT raise awareness of sudden, unexpected death in young people ( SADS ). The Task set for their key media coursework included, the students having to create an advertising campaign with the production elements being a storyboard for a TV advert and three magazine-style posters.

Steve Humphries, chair of JHMT, said : 'It was once again encouraging to see young students' put such time and commitment into learning more about heart issues affecting young people and coming up with a range of creative approaches on how to create greater awareness of SADS

Creating a Generation of Life Savers

Creating a Generation of Life Savers

national conference to discuss and promote the teaching of life-saving resuscitation skills in schools on Friday, 26th February 2016 at the Royal College of Physicians, Regents Park, London.

national conference to discuss and promote the teaching of life-saving resuscitation skills in schools on Friday, 26th February 2016 at the Royal College of Physicians, Regents Park, London.

There is good evidence that the provision of resuscitation training in schools is associated with increased rates of bystander CPR and improved survival after out of hospital cardiac arrest.

The aim of this national conference is to bring together all those with an interest or involvement in educational initiatives to provide training in CPR and AED awareness in schools. The intention is to share best practice, network, inspire and be inspired, and to promote a national conversation about how to emulate in the UK the improved cardiac arrest survival that has been achieved elsewhere.

The conference is targeted at professionals, educators, researchers, policy makers and others with an interest in the topic. A high level of interest is anticipated and places are limited.

For further details of the programme for the day and to complete a registration form please click on the document below.

Getting to the heart of saving young lives

Getting to the heart of saving young lives

A recent report from Youth Watch Australia once again hammered home that we can no longer take it for granted that fit and healthy people are exempt from falling victim to sudden cardiac death, caused by undiagnosed heart conditions.

'In a perfect world, imagine if there was a defibrillator at every sporting venue in the country'

There is no doubt that England and Australia's sporting rivalry is amongst the longest, hardest-fought and most engrossing in the world. But despite our differences, this common passion for sport has now united us. Whether in Leicestershire, UK or Victoria, Australia, we all recognise the importance of ensuring that heart safety is at the centre of player welfare.

A recent report from Youth Watch Australia once again hammered home that we can no longer take it for granted that fit and healthy people are exempt from falling victim to sudden cardiac death, caused by undiagnosed heart conditions.

They reported on the tragic case of 43-year-old Matt Richardson, a husband and father who collapsed and died while playing soccer in Sydney. "We've lost the centre of our universe," his family said.

Many of these deaths could have been prevented if there had been quick action and access to a defibrillator, say medics. Up to 33,000 Australians suffer cardiac arrest each year and fewer than five per cent survive. In the UK, there are 60,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests each year, of which 30,000 are witnessed and only between seven and 10 per cent survive. There are at least 12 young cardiac deaths in the UK every week.

The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust is a charity that relies on many wonderfully committed volunteers to help raise awareness and reduce the incidence of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) and other heart deaths.

The JHMT collaborates with the Leicester-shire Heartsafe schools' programme, which raises awareness of cardiac arrest in people of all ages. Basic CPR and defibrillator training has been provided to more than 9,000 year 10 pupils.

And Joe's MiniHeart Start For Sports Clubs is working to encourage all sports clubs to be better prepared to save a life by having quick access to a community-use defibrillator and ensuring that players, officials and supporters have basic CPR skills. Find out more about this free training on the JHMT website.

Every parent of a child playing sport should expect all clubs and events to be fully prepared and equipped to help anyone whose heart stops. This is also an opportunity to create a new generation of 'response-ability' athletes who know how to save a life.

It takes seconds to save a life – let's make sure this is one battle everyone wins.

Steve Humphries Chair of JHMT (First Person Column -– Leicester Mercury - –Thursday 10/12/15)

December 2015
Alan Wins Community Award for his Tireless Life-Saving Work

Alan Wins Community Award for his Tireless Life-Saving Work

A CHARITY volunteer who has trained hundreds of people in life-saving CPR has been recognised for his work at the Leicester City Sports Awards.

Alan Harrison White, a retired cardiac specialist nurse who gives his time for the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) and the British Heart Foundation, was presented with the Community Award at a ceremony last week.

Alan has travelled to all corners of the city and county, visiting schools and sports clubs with a vital lifesaving message.

While on his travels, Alan shares his lifesaving skills and knowledge on cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and how defibrillators work.

He explains the symptoms to look for that could be signs of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (SADS), a group of heart conditions which claim the lives of 12 young people aged 12-35 every week in the UK.

Alan said: "I was honoured to receive the award. I'm not sure who put my name forward, but it was a really nice surprise to be nominated, let alone win.

"I'm pleased to be able to use my skills to help people. CPR is easy to learn and the more people who know how to do it, the more lives potentially can be saved.

"I train a lot of young people and I like to think I'm training the next generation of life-savers."

The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), a local charity, was set up in memory of Rothley teenager Joe Humphries, who collapsed and tragically died from SADS in October 2012 while out jogging.

The JHMT now works tirelessly to raise awareness and reduce incidences of sudden heart death, often through life-saving training offered for free by people like Alan.

Chair of the JHMT Steve Humphries said: "Alan's work is amazing. He's visited more than 50 school assemblies, spoken to more than 10,000 pupils and more than 500 teachers to tell them why CPR is so important.

"He is a true gent. He visits local sports clubs as part of Joe's Mini HeartStart for Sports – our training scheme that gives local clubs a chance to learn life-saving skills for free.

"He and his wife Jill have trained 602 people in CPR on behalf of JHMT and the British Heart Foundation.

"Alan's achievement is truly fantastic but what's even more amazing is that we know he will not stop here – he'll keep going, keep sharing his knowledge and spreading the vital message – that these deaths can be prevented."

To find out more about the work of the JHMT and its life-saving training for sports clubs, visit www.jhmt.org.uk.

Heartsafe UK - creating the next generation of life-savers in LeicesterShire

Students at Long Field Academy, in Melton, are amongst the latest to benefit from life-saving training. Experts from the Leicestershire Heartsafe Schools Programme provided the training to the year 10 pupils, aimed at raising awareness of cardiac arrest and teaching them how to use an automated defibrillator, along with how to put someone in the recovery position.

The programme has provided automated defibrillators to 93 secondary schools in the city and county. The have been funded by a number of local charitable organisations including the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and Leicester City Foxes Foundation.

Dr William Toff, a director of Heartsafe and a senior lecturer in cardiology at the University of Leicester said: ‘ By ensuring every secondary school pupil receives training in these simple life-saving skills, we hope to improve the bystander response rate and improve survival rates from their current low level of less than 10% to as much as 50 per cent or more.’

Dr Doug Skehan, a Heartsafe director and consultant cardiologist, said: ‘ The training takes us a step closer to creating a generation of life-savers who can spread their training to their family and community.’

To find out more about both the Leicestershire Heartsafe Secondary Schools programme and Joe’s Mini Heartstart For Sports Clubs training go to: http://jhmt.org.uk/our-programmes

(Article courtesy of Leicester Mercury and photo credit to Lionel Heep)

Congratulations & Thanks to the 'Great Sports' from De Montfort University Students' Union

Congratulations & Thanks to the 'Great Sports' from De Montfort University Students' Union

CONGRATULATIONS AND THANKS to the 'great sports' from De Montfort University Students' Union (DSU - Sports) for a magnificent effort to raise funds, awareness and make a difference for Joe's Trust (JHMT) at today's annual charity football event held at Goals Leicester.

This memorable day of football with a record 43 teams turning out in force on a bitter cold January would not have been possible without the sterling efforts and enthusiasm of Abigail Battisto, chair of the women's football team and support from colleagues.

The curtain raiser challenge between DMU Students Select ( DMU Women's & Men's teams ) v JHMT Select proved a close affair with the DMU Students Select edging the match with a well deserved 4-3 win. That's one win each for both teams. We look forward to the re-match.

Thanks also to the JHMT Select squad who turned out including JHMT Patron Martin Johnson, Tommy Norton - capt, Rendall Munroe, Steve Booth, Steve Guppy, Paul Nixon, ( non-playing Steve Walsh), Lee (Snr) Smart, Lee (Jnr) Smart, and Carl Talins

Thanks also to Lee and team at Goals, Leicester Soccer Centre, Evington for their warm hospitality and those who donated prizes for the raffle.

DMU V JHMT picture galleries - please click on the website link below.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.681213988686951.1073741930.157002341108121&type=3

January 2016
Life-Saving Equipment Unveiled at Community Centre

Life-Saving Equipment Unveiled at Community Centre

A heart defibrillator has been fitted to the outside of Thurnby Lodge Youth and Community Centre, for local people to use.

The centre has many elderly residents and is near a park, football clubs, schools and a shopping precinct. It is the first defibrillator in the Thurncourt ward.

The machine, which is used restore the natural rhythm of the heart when a person is experiencing dangerous arrhythmia or cardiac arrest, has been funded by Thurncourt ward councillor funding and the Thurnby Lodge District and Community Association.

Local councillors Teresa Aldred and Paul Newcombe first came up with the idea due to family members who suffer from heart disease or who are at risk of Sudden Arrythmic Death Syndrome (SADS).

Cllr Aldred, who is at risk of SADS herself, along with her 10-year-old daughter, said: "We are delighted to have been able to get this vital piece of life-saving equipment installed for the local community.

"If people are reached within eight minutes of a cardiac arrest, they have a good chance of surviving.

"The community building is central to local people and is therefore a prime location for the defibrillator to be placed."

Cllr Newcombe added: "Myself and Cllr Aldred know people who suffer with heart disease and have been affected by SADS, so really wanted to do something to help.

"I'm really happy we could secure the money from ward funding and that the community association has matched this - If it can save just one persons life, it's been worth it."

Cllr Aldred and Cllr Newcome have also organised for local people to be trained how to use the new machine by the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

JHMT was set up in memory of Rothley teenager Joe Humphries, 14, who collapsed and died from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) while out jogging in October 2012.

Since then, the Trust has campaigned tirelessly to help prevent sudden heart deaths, including helping to fund community defibrillators and providing free life-saving training for schools, community groups and sports clubs.

Alan Harrison White is a retired cardiac nurse who carries out specialist CPR and defibrillator training on behalf of the trust.

Alan said: "It's great news that Thurnby Lodge now has a community defibrillator, and I'm really pleased that I will be able to help by offering free training. It is so important that people familiarise themselves with a defibrillator at the earliest opportunity so they are confident in using one at the scene of a cardiac arrest.

"If CPR is started immediately and done effectively, by a trained person, and a defibrillator can be got to the victim within eight minutes, the majority of people could be saved. That's got to be worth making sure you know CPR for – what's more important than knowing how to save someone's life?"

February 2016
'Hands On' to Learn Key Lifesaving Skills in Thurnby, Leicester

'Hands On' to Learn Key Lifesaving Skills in Thurnby, Leicester

Local residents and members of Thurnby Lodge Youth and Community Centre get 'Hands On' to learn vital key lifesaving skills.

Thanks to the efforts of local councillors and the community, a public access defibrillator was recently fitted to the outside of Thurnby Lodge Youth and Community Centre, Leicester for local people to use if called upon in case of an emergency.

To break down any barriers and fears and to ensure members of the community become familiar with the lifesaving equipment, JHMT's Alan Harrison White delivered a Heartsafe CPR and defibrillator training session at the community centre.

Alan said: ' Everyone can learn how to save a life with a few simple skills. I was delighted with the group's efforts to learn basic CPR and have a go on a training defibrillator. It is so important that people familiarise themselves with a defibrillator at the earliest opportunity so they are confident in using one at the scene of a cardiac arrest.'

The SADS facts of life:

  • There are 60,000 cardiac arrests in the UK every year with 30,000 out of hospital cardiac arrests witnessed bystanders and families and 27,000 do not survive the event ( 10%) survival.
  • All who suffer a cardiac arrest will die unless resuscitated within vital seconds and minutes.
  • Survival depends on:
  • Early intervention of effective CPR AND DEFIBRILLATION is the only way to re-establish the heart's natural Rhythm.
  • Over half of all cardiac arrests are witnessed by bystanders or family members.
  • International data shows 30-50% survival rates are possible and could be achieved by improved immediate responses that are easy to teach/provide.
  • Immediate action (CPR and defibrillation) more than doubles the chances of survival.
  • There are literally thousands of lives that could be saved, Survival rates decrease by 7 - 10% for every minute of delay but only 2-3% for every minute if CPR is instigated.
  • There are currently more than 650 potentially avoidable deaths of young people, 12 – 35 years old, with unrecognised heart conditions per year in the UK ( Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome).
  • Effective CPR buys invaluable time
  • No one should have to rely on 'luck' to survive a cardiac arrest

BeHEARTsafe communities just like Thurncourt ward, Leicester/Thurnby Lodge District and Community Association.

March 2016
Heart Matters @7eventsleics Family Health & Well-Being Festival

Heart Matters @7eventsleics Family Health & Well-Being Festival

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It's child's play when it comes down to getting hands - on, as demonstrated at the Family Health & Well Being Festival in Evington, Leicester and under the expert guidance of JHMT's Community Liaison Officer and trainer Alan Harrison White.

More than 100 x people of all ages stepped up to have a go on Eric's chest ( Resusci Anne First Aid Manikin) and become familiar with how to use an AED.

Many congratulations to Jit Chauhan and his team from 7 Events - http://www.7events.org/ - for putting on of such a diverse family health orientated event for the Evington community.

Once again, 'many thanks' to JHMT's Alan Harrison White for sharing his vast knowledge and expertise to help people learn basic hands-on lifesaving skills on how to save a life.

A great result all-round with people also going going away from the event with a greater awareness and understanding on SADS - underlying Inherited heart conditions that can lead to sudden cardiac death in young people between 12 - 35 years old.

Family Health & Well Being Festival photo library: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.311869068954780.1073741853.157002341108121&type=3

vington Leisure Centre, Saturday, 16th April 2016 - Everyone' can learn CPR and how to use an AED.

April 2016

Niamh & Beth Launch GO18FORJOE & Help to Save Young Heartbeats

TWO budding creative designers have been using their skills to raise awareness of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS).

Niamh Beange and Beth Russell, both aged 19, are taking a graphics and e-media foundation degree at Leicester College and De Montfort University. They are the creative force behind GO18FORJOE, a new campaign from local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

Joe was a victim of SADS, a condition which can strike anyone at any time, particularly seemingly fit and healthy young people. Twelve young people aged 12-35 in Britain die each week from undiagnosed heart problems like SADS.

Since Joe's death, his family and friends have campaigned tirelessly to raise awareness and try to reduce the instances of this silent killer. They set up a local charity, the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), and it is the Trust which has launched GO18FORJOE.

Niamh said: "We found out about the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust through our course – there was a chance to get work experience with the charity while completing our coursework. We thought it was a great opportunity.

"As we learned more about the JHMT, its aims really resonated with us. It's a charity that does so much for young people, allowing them to reach their potential whilst keeping them safe, by making them aware of this lethal condition which affects our age group. It's a cause that many young people do not know enough about. We're glad to be a part of changing that."

Beth added: "We have designed the campaigns logo and look for GO18FORJOE including leaflets, a 'selfie board' that people can have their photo taken with, sponsorship forms and a header photo which people can use to show their support for the campaign by posting on their social media profile. Many of these materials are included in the GO18FORJOE kit available to download on JHMT's website.

"I hope the work we've done will help more people – especially young people – to be inspired by the work of the Trust so that they join the campaign and GO18FORJOE."

Chair of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust Steve Humphries said:

"The idea behind GO18FORJOE is to invite Joe's many friends from his school year, his family and Trust supporters – along with anyone who wants to get involved – to take on a personal challenge, anytime from now until April 2017.

"We're asking people to do something involving the number 18, with plenty of license to be creative. Maybe you'll run or walk 18 miles for Joe, cycle 18 miles, or play nine-a-side-football.

"You could play 18 overs of cricket or 18 holes of crazygolf,or swim 18 lengths of a pool.

"Or maybe you'll choose to sing 18 songs at a charity concert, get together as a group of 18 to hold a fundraising bake sale, or simply choose to learn CPR and how to use a defibrillator.

"You can then tweet us using the hashtag #GO18FORJOE and let us know what you're doing to raise awareness, funds, or how you're going to pledge support for our campaign.

"So many young people like our Joe are denied the right to celebrate their 18th, as Joe would have done tomorrow (21 April), due to undiagnosed heart conditions like SADS.

"GO18FORJOE is a chance for everyone to get motivated, creative and active and do something positive to help save young heartbeats".

To find out more, visit www.jhmt.org.uk or follow the Trust on Twitter @JHMTorguk or on Facebook facebook.com/JHMTorguk.

All campaign materials are available in a downloadable format direct from www.jhmt.org.uk/GO18FORJOE

May 2016
On your Marks, Get Set, Go!  Get Ready to Run a Very Special Mile for Joe

On your Marks, Get Set, Go! Get Ready to Run a Very Special Mile for Joe

FAMILIES and young children are invited to join a charity mile-long fun run to support the work of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

Joe's Jog, now in its third year, will take place before the Mattioli Woods Rothley 10k running event, which takes place in the Leicestershire village on Tuesday 14 June.

The inclusive and family-friendly fun run gives families and children aged seven and over the chance to be part of the Rothley 10k evening. It also raises awareness of the vital work of the JHMT.

Joe's Jog will start at 6.18pm. The precise start time is because this year would have seen Joe Humphries turn 18, so JHMT has launched GO18FORJOE, a campaign to encourage people to get involved with the charity by doing something based around the number 18.

Joe was 14 when he collapsed and died suddenly while out jogging near his Rothley home. He was a victim of SADS – sudden arrhythmic death syndrome – a heart condition which can strike anyone at any time, particularly otherwise fit and healthy young people.

Since Joe's death, his family and friends have worked tirelessly to raise awareness of SADS and sudden heart deaths. They set up the JHMT to provide free CPR training, help fund community defibrillators and campaign for better understanding of SADS. The charity also runs the Inspire Awards, a small grants scheme that helps inspiring young people to fulfill their potential.

Steve Humphries, chair of the JHMT, said: "This is another chance for families to stride out together at our annual fun run, which helps bring the community together in raising funds for JHMT's work to save young heartbeats.

"Nearly 100 runners took part last year and we do hope for another great turnout this year.

"We'll also have our GO18FORJOE selfie board on hand and will be asking people to show their support for JHMT by having their picture taken with it – it says "I'm going 18 for Joe" – and posting their picture on social media. It's an important year for our charity, and we want to spread the word about our work as widely as possible, which is why we've launched the GO18FORJOE campaign."

Advance entry costs £5 for adults and £3 for children (minimum age 7). On-the-day entry costs £10 for adults and £6 for children.

All funds raised from Joe's Jog will go towards JHMT's vital work.

To take part in Joe's Jog, enter online at: www.jhmt.org.uk/events/2016/06/joes-jog1

To find out more about the Trust's work, to get involved as a volunteer, or to learn how to apply for the Inspire Awards or CPR training for your sports club, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

More information about the Mattioli Woods Rothley 10k is available at www.rothley10k.com

Wigston Magna Methodist Church Installs Community Defibrillator

Wigston Magna Methodist Church Installs Community Defibrillator

A POTENTIALLY life-saving community defibrillator has been installed outside Wigston Magna Methodist Church.

The congregation at the church, in Cross Street, was assisted by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) in getting the defibrillator in place.

David Cawthorn, a senior member of the congregation at the church, said: "We know that defibrillators can save lives, so we wanted to get one – not only for the benefit of church members, but also for the wider community.

"The JHMT helped us to source funding for the defibrillator and make a successful bid to the Department of Health for some funding administered by the British Heart Foundation. We now have both a defibrillator and a cabinet to be placed on the wall of the church, so it will be accessible 24 hours a day to anyone in the local community."

The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust was set up in 2012 after the death of Rothley 14-year-old Joe Humphries from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS).

JHMT campaigns tirelessly for greater awareness and understanding of undiagnosed heart conditions, particularly in otherwise seemingly fit and healthy young people.

It also helps communities to get defibrillators in place, provides free CPR training for community sports clubs and groups, and runs a small grants scheme, the Inspire Awards, to help young people fulfil their potential.

David added: "This is tremendous. So often we hear of people suffering a cardiac arrest, either at home or whilst out in their local community. Speedy use of a defibrillator, along with cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), significantly increases their chances of survival. We are delighted that this defibrillator is now available, for both the church and the whole community.'

Charles Poole from the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust added: "When someone suffers a suspected cardiac arrest, call 999 immediately. Push hard and fast on the centre of the chest 30 times. Give two rescue breaths. Keep going until the emergency services arrive. If you'd rather not give rescue breaths, then you can deliver hands-only CPR. That's better than doing nothing.

"The ambulance service call handler, as well as despatching immediate assistance, has a map showing the location of public access defibrillators. They will advise the caller to get another person, if possible, to fetch the defibrillator.

"As soon as it arrives, switch it on and use it. Do not wait for the emergency services to arrive. A series of built-in voice prompts on the defibrillator itself will then give clear instructions. The defibrillator will only operate if the patient needs it, which means they can't be harmed.

"Although basically anyone can use the defibrillator without prior training, it's highly recommended that people familiarise themselves with an AED at the earliest opportunity so they are confident in using one at the scene of a cardiac arrest."

The defibrillator at Wigston Magna Methodist Church was commissioned by Rev David Vale during morning service on 8 May 2016, and is now in place and fully operational.

Defibrillators Should be in all Schools

Defibrillators Should be in all Schools

The work goes on to equip young people in Leicester-Shire schools with key ‎CPR & ‎defibrillation skills

Education bosses are encouraging all schools to have a defibrillator on site in case of emergencies.

It follows the tragic death of trainee teacher, Ian Babington, at Roundhill Academy, last month.

Mr Babington, 45, collapsed while teaching after suffering a heart attack.

Despite efforts to revive him using the school's defibrillator, he died the following day.

It's believed around 93 schools across the city and county have defibrillators, along with specifically trained staff.

Many schools acquired them following the death of Joe Humphries who died from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (Sads) aged just 14 in October 2012, while out running near his family home in Rothley.

In the wake of this, his family set up theJoe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) and have been campaigning tirelessly for schools and elsewhere to get defibrillators through the Heartsafe programme.

James Tickle, head of Roundhill Academy, said: "We contacted Heartsafe regarding its programme after receiving a leaflet about the project and a presentation to Leicestershire secondary heads. We've had a defibrillator since October 2015 and there are currently 11 staff trained in using it.

"It's kept in the main school office and is easily accessible. Our intention is to train every child in Key Stage 4 in CPR and use of the defibrillator.

"We highly recommend all schools look into the Heartsafe programme which aims to ensure that every young person receives emergency life support training and guidance on how to use a defibrillator."

Councillor Sarah Russell, assistant city mayor for schools, said: "All our city secondaries have defibrillators and we would encourage others to get them too because you just never know when it might be needed."

Steve Humphries, Joe's dad, said: "The Leicestershire Heartsafe Schools Programme provides training to year 10 pupils, aimed at raising awareness of cardiac arrest and teaching them how to use an automated defibrillator, along with how to put someone in the recovery position.

"The programme has provided 93 of these to secondary schools in the city and county.

"Without question, every child who leaves school should know how to save a life including and how to use an defibrillator as we need to make inroads into the horrendously low survival rates of less then 10 per cent in the UK surviving a cardiac arrest.

"They should be as common as fire extinguishers and not just confined to schools."

Rushey Mead Academy, says it has never had to use its defibrillator but staff are happy it's available.

Assistant principal Zoe Conneally said: "We know through Heartsafe and the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust just how important it is to have this piece of vital life saving equipment. I'd urge all schools to get one without doubt. They're easy to use and tell you whether or not the individual is actually in need of it. We educate our pupils to have first aid skills and are constantly refreshing them."

Taylor Road Primary is St Matthews, Leicester, also has a defibrillator.

Head teacher Chris Hassall said: "We absolutely felt that it was something we should have in the school and others should too."

By Fiona Dryden - Leicester Mercury Education Correspondent

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/Defibrillators-schools/story-29233088-detail/story.html

£10k Charity Aim for Pals

£10k Charity Aim for Pals

Alongside Leicester City FC, 7 Events Jit Chauhan is in the @LeicsMercury today talking about their 'kind hearted' campaign! to support local charities including support for JHMT's work to save young heart beats. ‪#‎Leicester‬ ‪#‎Charity‬ ‪#‎Community‬.

A group of friends are planning to raise £10,000 for charity in 12 months with a series of seven events.

Jits Chauhan, a 42 year old architect from Oadby is one of the members of a group now numbering about 30 people who are pulling together to put on events and complete charity challenges.

Several of the 7 events group were already planning to take on various separate feats for charity and now they are combining their efforts to get more support and also putting on their own events for the good of the community.

Their first event was a community information day in Oadby.

Jit and his friends delivered 2,5000 leaflets to houses in the area to let people know it was happening. He said: 'we were going to raise some money anyway with a few sponsored things and I thought we could really make a difference in a bigger way.

'So over a year, until April, we are doing events and sponsored challenges. It's not all about raising money - the first event, on 16th April was a health and well-being event for the community with educational things like CPR training. The whole thing started out with me and a few friends but it's escalated and now there are about 30 people involved.

The original target was £10,000 but we could hit £15,000 or maybe £25,000. That would be perfect'.

Other events in the coming months will include a 13 mile off-road mud run, a 10km run through Cannock Chase, near Stafford and a 100 mile bike ride.

Some of the group have already taken part in the London Marathon to donate towards the total.

The money will be split between the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust, the teenage cancer unit at Leicester Royal Infirmary, the bone marrow transfer unit at the Infirmary and the LOROS hospice.

Rather than just handing out cheques, the 7 events group wants to buy equipment for the good causes, depending on how much they raise.

For more information visit www.7events.org/our-campaign

Running as ONE to help JHMT Raise Awareness & Save Young Heartbeats

Running as ONE to help JHMT Raise Awareness & Save Young Heartbeats

The people of Charnwood and surrounding villages turned out in force to cheer on 133 runners in a charity mile-long fun run earlier this week.

The run was held to support the work of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), and took place in Joe's home village of Rothley.

Joe's Jog, now in its third year, kicked off just before the Mattioli Woods Rothley 10k running event on Tuesday 14 June.

The inclusive and family-friendly fun run gave families and children aged seven and over the chance to be part of the Rothley 10k evening. It also raised awareness of the vital work of the JHMT.

First home was 13-year-old Ryan Elston, of Mountsorrel, in a cracking time of five minutes and 41 seconds.

Second was Cameron Harrison-White, 14, of Mountsorrel, in 5:59 and third was Angus Lloyd, 15, of Cropston, in 6:09.

Fourth place went to 14 year-old Samuel Pilbeam, of Rothley, in 6:12.

Joe's Jog started at 6.18pm. The precise start time was because this year would have seen Joe Humphries turn 18, so JHMT has launched GO18FORJOE, a campaign to encourage people to get involved with the charity by doing something based around the number 18.

Joe was 14 when he collapsed and died suddenly while out jogging near his Rothley home. He was a victim of SADS – sudden arrhythmic death syndrome – a heart condition which can strike anyone at any time, particularly otherwise fit and healthy young people.

Since Joe's death, his family and friends have worked tirelessly to raise awareness of SADS and sudden heart deaths. They set up the JHMT to provide free CPR training, help fund community defibrillators and campaign for better understanding of SADS. The charity also runs the Inspire Awards, a small grants scheme that helps inspiring young people to fulfill their potential.

Steve Humphries, chair of the JHMT, said: "Despite the rain, nothing could dampen the spirits of our runners and Joe's army of volunteers who helped to organise this event. We're tremendously grateful to everyone for their help and support.

"This annual fun run helps bring the community together in raising funds for JHMT's work to save young heartbeats."

A total of £800 was raised from Joe's Jog and will go towards JHMT's vital work.

To find out more about the Trust, to get involved as a volunteer, or to learn how to apply for the Inspire Awards or CPR training for your sports club, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

June 2016
Cricket club determined to hit sudden heart death for six

Cricket club determined to hit sudden heart death for six

A FORMER Leicestershire batsman and England coach has helped launch a campaign to train amateur cricketers in vital life-saving skills.

Tim Boon, England under-19s coach and an ex-county player, attended Rothley Park Cricket Club to lend his support for the campaign, which has been organised by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

The club recently purchased a defibrillator and will be receiving training from the charity in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and how to use a defibrillator.

Steve Thomason from Rothley Park Cricket Club said: "We have strong links with JHMT, as the charity is based in the same village as us. JHMT has been our charity of choice to support for the last few years through the Party in the Park, an annual fund-raising event we host in Rothley each summer."

"We've bought a defibrillator for our club and now we want to make sure as many people as possible – both players and club officials – know how to use it."

"Next year, our 200th anniversary, we are having a new clubhouse built where the defibrillator will be installed in a box on the outside wall. This means it will be accessible 24/7 to the community, should it be needed in an emergency."

Club secretary Sam Rowe added: "As a leading club in the county, we pride ourselves on providing an enjoyable and safe environment for all players, club officials and people who attend matches. We have also become more aware of the importance of learning life-saving skills and having a defibrillator on site since the tragic loss of young Joe Humphries, who died from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) while out on a jog."

"We know, through the work of Joe's Trust, that sudden cardiac arrest is unpredictable and can strike anyone, anywhere, at any time. It can affect people of all ages, including young people, of which we have more than 100 registered at our club."

"I do hope the club's example provides the impetus for more clubs to follow suit in creating a heart safe cricket community across Leicestershire. It's so important that we are all better prepared in case of an emergency in and around the grounds and local community."

"Having more people trained in CPR, having access to a defibrillator and knowing how to use it could mean the difference between life and death."

The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust offers free training in these vital skills to sports clubs across the city and county, in an effort to ensure that as many people as possible know how to save a life if an emergency occurs.

It also works to promote awareness of sudden heart deaths, after the death of Rothley lad Joe Humphries, in 2012, aged just 14.

Tim Boon, England under-19s coach, former Leicestershire batsman and supporter of JHMT, added: "Congratulations to everyone involved in putting in the time and energy to create a safer environment at Rothley Park Cricket club. Their efforts will also benefit the local community."

"Having more club personnel, including players, trained in hands-on CPR with access to a defibrillator should be an essential part of any sports club's duty of care to protect players as well as everyone else."

"This is one area where sport, and in this case cricket, can and should play its part in helping to create a safer community for all."

To find out more about the JHMT or enquire about training for your club, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

You can also follow the Trust on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/jhmtorguk or @jhmt.org.uk

July 2016
The future of England Women's Cricket in 'SAFE HANDS'

The future of England Women's Cricket in 'SAFE HANDS'

Some of the country's up and coming women's cricketers are amongst the latest to benefit from life-saving training including hands-on CPR, how to use an AED and to put someone in the recovery position.

Experts from the *Leicestershire Resuscitation Training Programme, provided the training to the squad and staff who attended the camp at National Cricket Academy at Loughborough University.

Tim Boon, England U19s coach, former Leicestershire batsmen and senior coach and supporter of The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust said: "The women's cricket development pathway encourages and challenges girls to develop their all round skills on and off the field. All the girls had the opportunity to learn more about heart health and undiagnosed heart conditions, SADS , that can effect seemingly fit and healthy young people."

"They were grateful for the education and now feel better prepared to save a life on and off the field of play in cricket. Some of the key components for being successful in any team sport include trust, unity and looking out for each other."

"Now we know that sudden cardiac arrest can also strike anyone of any age without any warning, the girls now also realise it requires a collective team effort to save a life in an emergency, as every second counts."

https://www.facebook.com/JHMTorguk/photos/?tab=album&album_id=763234503818232

Background:

Every child can be a lifesaver:

The *Leicestershire Resuscitation Training Programme ( LRTP - @LRTP_UK ) has provided automated defibrillators to 93 Secondary Schools in the city and county and trained 13,000 year 10 pupils in basic life-saving training. These have been funded by a number of local charitable organisations including the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and Leicester City Foxes Foundation.

*A multi-agency approach including sign-up from head teachers within both the City and County secondary schools and the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust in collaboration with the East Midlands Pacemaker Fund (EMPF), the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (UHL), the University of Leicester, the British Heart Foundation (BHF), East Midlands Ambulance Service (EMAS) and Resuscitation Council (UK), working to delver a focused CPR based training package which is being delivered across Leicester and Leicestershire and is known as LRTP.

Joe's Mini HeartStart for Sports Clubs - Being prepared is half the victory:

In addition a pioneering scheme, Joe's Mini Heart Start for sports clubs, is FREE and being rolled out across community sports clubs in Leicestershire and working to encourage all sports clubs to be better prepared to save a life by having quick access to a community use - defibrillator and ensuring that players, official and supporters have basic CPR skills - http://jhmt.org.uk/heartstart/

New defibrillator for city golf course

New defibrillator for city golf course

GOLF COURSE users are set to benefit from a new defibrillator – and life-saving training so that they know how to use it.

Players at Humberstone Heights Golf Course have recently had a new defibrillator installed, for use by the local community.

They have also arranged for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillator training to be delivered to club users and members, golf tutors and staff from the city council's Parks Services team who work at the course.

The open-access golf course was recently revamped by owner Leicester City Council as part of a £380,000 improvement programme, which included buying the defibrillator.

The training, called Joe's Mini Heartstart for Sports, will be provided for free by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), which works to raise awareness of, and prevent, sudden heart deaths.

The first session takes place at 6pm on Tuesday (5 July) and will be led by JHMT's Alan Harrison White.

Golf course manager David Butler said: "I'm really pleased that we have a new defibrillator and that we'll be getting training in CPR. The training will be extremely beneficial to our members and golf course users, and we're grateful to the JHMT for providing it."

Deputy city mayor Cllr Rory Palmer, who leads on health integration for Leicester, said: "One of our manifesto commitments is to make sure defibrillators are available in our city parks and open spaces. We've already installed defibrillators at several locations – Abbey, Braunstone, Evington, Humberstone, Spinney Hill, Watermead and Victoria parks, and at Aylestone Hall Gardens as well as Rushey Fields and Cossington recreation grounds.

"We're putting in more, in a rolling programme, until all our parks and open spaces have access to a defibrillator. It's great that local charities like JHMT are working with us by offering CPR and defibrillator training."

Dr Mike Ferguson from the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust said: "Sadly, in the UK, there are 60,000 cardiac arrests every year in the community. Half of these are witnessed, often by family and friends, but the survival rate is less than 10 per cent.

"Only 20 per cent of victims are in a 'shockable rhythm', which is treatable by defibrillation, by the time an ambulance arrives. Survival is much more likely when a shockable rhythm is present.

"The proportion of people in a shockable rhythm could be increased if more cardiac arrest victims received immediate and effective CPR from bystanders. That's why we're so keen to provide this vitally important training and make sure as many people as possible know what to do to increase someone's chances of survival."

To find out more about the JHMT, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

To find out more about Leicester's parks and green spaces, visit www.leicester.gov.uk/parks

Three Free Lectures will Mark this Year's SADS Awareness Week

A LOCAL charity will hold three free lectures later this year to help promote understanding of sudden heart deaths.

The lectures, which have just been announced, will take place in Leicester and Loughborough during SADS Week (1-8 October 2016), a key awareness-raising week organised by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), in conjunction with the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

SADS stands for sudden arrhythmic death syndrome, a deadly and often hidden heart condition. Twelve young people aged 12-35 years old in Britain die each week from undiagnosed heart problems like SADS.

On Wednesday 5 October, a lecture called 'Marvellous Medicine' will examine what skills it takes to save a life.

The lecture, at Leicester General Hospital, is open to the public and starts at 6pm.

It will explain what SADS is, and why speed matters when responding to someone who has collapsed in cardiac arrest.

It will demonstrate how public-access defibrillators can make a difference, and offer the audience the chance – if they wish – to acquire vital life-saving CPR skills, which take only two minutes to learn.

Dr Ffion Davies, medical advisor to the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and consultant in A&E at University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL), is co-ordinating and will deliver the programme of lectures.

She said: "Each year, on the anniversary of Joe Humphries' untimely death, we hold the annual SADS Awareness Week where we remind and educate healthcare professionals, sports-related professionals and parents and carers of young people about the dangers of undiagnosed heart conditions like SADS.

"Year on year, we build on the awareness we raise of these undiagnosed heart conditions, so that Leicestershire is now at the forefront of CPR training.

"This year, we are delighted to be providing three talks to promote awareness. This first event, which we're holding in conjunction with Leicester's hospitals, will show what UHL already does in terms of this condition, and provide an opportunity for people to learn CPR skills."

On Thursday 6 October, Ffion will deliver a further lecture at Loughborough University, examining sudden cardiac death in sport.

The lecture, which starts at 6pm, will look at how SADS is relevant to sports activity and sports professionals, and will offer university staff, students and members of the public the chance to learn CPR skills.

And on Friday 7 October, there will be a talk for health professionals at Leicester Royal Infirmary, to increase their knowledge about SADS.

The talk – called the Friday Forum – starts at 1pm and asks the question: what have we been missing when it comes to SADS awareness?

Speakers alongside Ffion will include Dr Doug Skehan and Dr Bill Toff from Leicestershire Resuscitation Training Programme, plus Drs Pradeep Vasudevan and Riyaz Somani from UHL.

Martin Johnson, former England rugby captain and patron of the JHMT, said: "The work goes on to ensure as many people as is possible learn more about these deadly heart conditions, which can strike seemingly fit and healthy young people without any warning.

"That's why it's so important that sports club coaches – and anyone who works with young people undertaking physical activity – know the signs and symptoms to look out for.

"Training people so that they know what to do in a timeframe of a vital few minutes could mean the difference between life and death."

The 'Marvellous Medicine' and sudden cardiac death in sport lectures are free to attend and are open to all members of the public.

An online booking system is available for the sudden cardiac death in sport lecture. People can, if they wish, turn up on the night, but booking is recommended. To book online go to: http://www.jhmt.org.uk/sads-talk

To find out more about the JHMT and its work, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

You can also follow the Trust on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/jhmtorguk or @jhmt.org.uk

Talented Six get Awards from Local Charity

Talented Six get Awards from Local Charity

TWO talented swimmers, an aspiring film-maker and a budding badminton player are among the latest round of young people to benefit from an Inspire Award.

Awards have also been handed out to a gifted roller hockey player and a budding basketball star, as part of the scheme to help talented young people fulfil their ambitions.

The Inspire Awards scheme is run by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), and offers small grants of up to £500 to help young people achieve their goals in sports, music, the arts, business or community involvement.

Among the latest beneficiaries are William Bell, 14, from Leicestershire, a talented swimmer who dreams of wearing the Team GB jacket and representing his country at international swimming events.

William, a member of City of Leicester Swimming Club, said: "The Inspire grant of £250 will make a real difference to help fund my entries into swim meets around the country."

Thirteen-year-old Sameer Chenia, from Scraptoft, Leicester, has been the top-ranked badminton player in his age group for the past four years.

Encouraged by his parents and with coaching and support from Leicestershire Badminton Association and KAS badminton, Sameer says his £250 Inspire Award 'means the world' to him.

Finlay Walker, 14, from Wigston, has been selected to play roller hockey for Great Britain in Hawaii this summer. He plays for the Midland Mooseheads inline hockey team, in Lutterworth.

Finlay, who took up the sport three years ago, is a prolific scorer for his team. He said: "The £250 JHMT Inspire grant is vitally important as every bit helps towards playing kits and travel costs. I'm really excited about going to Hawaii."

Fourteen-year-old Karam Sandhu, from Leicester, started playing basketball for the Leicester Warriors basketball club from the age of eight.

This year, Karam has been a pivotal member of the U14s team with highest points scored, number of assists and rebounds.

Leicester Warriors coach Arbham Giga said: "Karam is a dedicated and hardworking player. He is very passionate about basketball and focuses on getting better and learning all the time."

Karam said: 'My Inspire Award of £300 will mean the world to me. Basketball is very expensive, especially when it comes to court hire. I have a dream to become an England player."

Jess O'Brien is a 15-year-old budding film-maker from Market Harborough. She has written and directed her first film, organised her own premiere at an independent cinema, and had her work selected to play at international film festivals.

Jess has to rely on borrowing her teacher's camera to make films, so plans to put her £390 Inspire Award towards buying her own equipment.

Jess said: "This camera will allow me to be more independent and to continue to strive towards my goal of working in the film industry."

Michaella Glenister, 14, from Loughborough, is one of a growing band of young and talented local swimmers. She trains with City of Leicester swimming club and dreams of competing at the Olympics.

"My £200 Inspire Award means so much to me, as it will help to fund my upcoming meets and hopefully bring me closer to my lifetime goal," she said.

Simon Taylor, Inspire Awards project lead, said: "These young people truly are inspiring. I'm always struck by the sheer determination and hard work that they put in to achieving their goals.

"It's a pleasure to be able to help them out – and it's also the start of a great relationship between the Trust and these young people, because they keep in touch and let us know how our grants have helped them."

The Inspire Awards are just part of the work carried out by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), which was set in memory of 14 year old Leicestershire teenager Joe Humphries who collapsed and died whilst out jogging in Rothley. Joe was a victim of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS), a group of inherited heart conditions that can cause sudden cardiac death in young people.

The idea is that the awards help young people achieve their ambitions – something which Joe, tragically, was never able to do.

To find out more about the Inspire Awards and the work of the Trust, go to www.jhmt.org.uk.

August 2016
Heartwize Cricket Cardiac Arrest Awareness Day a Big Success

Heartwize Cricket Cardiac Arrest Awareness Day a Big Success

HEARTWIZE Cricket day - getting to the HEART of the matter - saving lives and demonstrates that by learning a few simple skills - everyone can be a lifesaver

'Thanks' to Leicestershire County Cricket Club for hosting the HEARTWIZE Cricket Day during the Sussex match today.

This collaberative approach with JHMT and HEARTWIZE LTP along with Limehurst School gave foxes fans and staff the opportunity to learn basic CPR and breakdown some of the myths and concerns for people about what a defibrillator looks like and how these vital pieces of lifesaving equipment operate in practise.

And as we now know, seemingly fit and healthy young people can also be susceptible to undiagnosed heart conditions.

The event would not have been possible with fantastic contribution of so many talented and kind hearted people working together to create a 'heart safe' community across the city and county on and off the field of play.

Thanks to Leicestershire County Cricket Club's Rob Leather, Martyn Dobson, all the players and all levels of staff at the club, Heartwize's Bill Toft, Julie Young, JHMT's Alan Harrison White and photographers Stephen Baum and Chris Mount, Trust supporter and cricket lead Tim Boon, the staff and pupils at Limehurst School both Leicester Mercury and BBC Radio Leicester for once again raising awareness of the ongoing work of JHMT and Heartwize Secondary Schools Resuscitation Training Programme.

Finally, it was so encouraging to see foxes fans all of ages stepping up and having a go to learn hand CPR and how to use a defibrillator.

https://www.facebook.com/JHMTorguk/photos/?tab=album&album_id=795571790584503

http://www.leicestershireccc.co.uk/news/2016/september/cardiac-arrest-awareness-day-a-big-success.html

http://www.leicestershireccc.co.uk/news/2016/august/club-to-hold-cardiac-arrest-awareness-day.html

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/8203-cricket-club-event-could-turn-out-to-be-lifesaver/story-29685103-detail/story.html

September 2016
LCC Parks Staff Get CPR Training & Learn How to Use an AED with Support from JHMT

LCC Parks Staff Get CPR Training & Learn How to Use an AED with Support from JHMT

STAFF working in the city council's parks services are being trained in life-saving skills.

Defibrillators have recently been installed in many of the city's parks and open spaces, including Abbey, Braunstone, Evington, Humberstone, Spinney Hill, Watermead and Victoria parks, and at Aylestone Hall Gardens as well as Rushey Fields and Cossington recreation grounds.

Now parks staff, volunteers and members of the community are being given training so that they know how to use the automated external defibrillators (AEDs) if the need arises.

They will also learn vital cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques, so that they know what to do if someone collapses in suspected cardiac arrest.

The training is being provided for free by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), which works to raise awareness of, and prevent, sudden heart deaths.

The most recent session took place at Abbey Park on Tuesday 23 August.

Deputy city mayor Cllr Rory Palmer, who leads on health integration for Leicester, said: "Our goal is to have a defibrillator in all our parks and open spaces – we made a manifesto commitment to do this.

"A defibrillator is a vital piece of life-saving equipment, and it's good to see them becoming a more common sight across cities, towns and villages in our region and beyond.

"But what's equally important is that people know how to use a defibrillator and perform CPR if the need arises.

"That's why we're pleased to be working with the JHMT to ensure as many people as possible learn these vital life-saving skills."

Assistant city mayor Cllr Piara Singh Clair, who has responsibility for culture, leisure and sport, said: "I'm very pleased that parks staff and friends of parks groups are learning these skills and that we already have so many defibrillators in place. We'll continue this work and we will continue to work with charities like the JHMT to raise awareness of the importance of learning how to save a life."

Dr Mike Ferguson from the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust said: "Sadly, in the UK, there are 60,000 cardiac arrests every year in the community. Half of these are witnessed, often by family and friends, but the survival rate is less than 10 per cent.

"Only 20 per cent of victims are in a 'shockable rhythm', which is treatable by defibrillation, by the time an ambulance arrives. Survival is much more likely when a shockable rhythm is present.

"The proportion of people in a shockable rhythm could be increased if more cardiac arrest victims received immediate and effective CPR from bystanders. That's why we're so keen to provide this vitally important training and make sure as many people as possible know what to do to increase someone's chances of survival.

"With cardiac arrest, it is better for a bystander to do something than to do nothing."

To find out more about Leicester's parks and green spaces, visit www.leicester.gov.uk/parks

http://www.leicester.gov.uk/news/news-features/defibrillator-training-rolled-out-across-leicesters-parks/

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/parks-staff-in-leicester-being-trained-to-save-lives/story-29658211-detail/story.html

( Press release courtesy of Leicester City Council's Press Office)

Three Free Lectures will Mark this Year's SADS Awareness Week

Three Free Lectures will Mark this Year's SADS Awareness Week

A LOCAL charity will hold three free lectures later this year to help promote understanding of sudden heart deaths.

The lectures, which have just been announced, will take place in Leicester and Loughborough during SADS Week (1-8 October 2016), a key awareness-raising week organised by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), in conjunction with the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

SADS stands for sudden arrhythmic death syndrome, a deadly and often hidden heart condition. Twelve young people aged 12-35 years old in Britain die each week from undiagnosed heart problems like SADS.

On Wednesday 5 October, a lecture called 'Marvellous Medicine' will examine what skills it takes to save a life.

The lecture, at Leicester General Hospital, is open to the public and starts at 6pm.

It will explain what SADS is, and why speed matters when responding to someone who has collapsed in cardiac arrest.

It will demonstrate how public-access defibrillators can make a difference, and offer the audience the chance – if they wish – to acquire vital life-saving CPR skills, which take only two minutes to learn.

Dr Ffion Davies, medical advisor to the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and consultant in A&E at University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL), is co-ordinating and will deliver the programme of lectures.

She said: "Each year, on the anniversary of Joe Humphries' untimely death, we hold the annual SADS Awareness Week where we remind and educate healthcare professionals, sports-related professionals and parents and carers of young people about the dangers of undiagnosed heart conditions like SADS.

"Year on year, we build on the awareness we raise of these undiagnosed heart conditions, so that Leicestershire is now at the forefront of CPR training.

"This year, we are delighted to be providing three talks to promote awareness. This first event, which we're holding in conjunction with Leicester's hospitals, will show what UHL already does in terms of this condition, and provide an opportunity for people to learn CPR skills."

On Thursday 6 October, Ffion will deliver a further lecture at Loughborough University, examining sudden cardiac death in sport.

The lecture, which starts at 6pm, will look at how SADS is relevant to sports activity and sports professionals, and will offer university staff, students and members of the public the chance to learn CPR skills.

And on Friday 7 October, there will be a talk for health professionals at Leicester Royal Infirmary, to increase their knowledge about SADS.

The talk – called the Friday Forum – starts at 1pm and asks the question: what have we been missing when it comes to SADS awareness?

Speakers alongside Ffion will include Dr Doug Skehan and Dr Bill Toff from Leicestershire Resuscitation Training Programme, plus Drs Pradeep Vasudevan and Riyaz Somani from UHL.

Martin Johnson, former England rugby captain and patron of the JHMT, said: "The work goes on to ensure as many people as is possible learn more about these deadly heart conditions, which can strike seemingly fit and healthy young people without any warning.

"That's why it's so important that sports club coaches – and anyone who works with young people undertaking physical activity – know the signs and symptoms to look out for.

"Training people so that they know what to do in a timeframe of a vital few minutes could mean the difference between life and death."

The 'Marvellous Medicine' and sudden cardiac death in sport lectures are free to attend and are open to all members of the public.

An online booking system is available for the sudden cardiac death in sport lecture. People can, if they wish, turn up on the night, but booking is recommended. To book online go to: http://www.jhmt.org.uk/sads-talk

To find out more about the JHMT and its work, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

You can also follow the Trust on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/jhmtorguk or @jhmt.org.uk

JHMT Inspire Awards for Six Young People with Entrepreneurial Flair

JHMT Inspire Awards for Six Young People with Entrepreneurial Flair

SIX young people with entrepreneurial skills have all received awards from a local grants scheme.

Sagar Haria, Gregor Sinclair and Kimiri Singh are all benefitting from Inspire Awards, along with Keltoum Baddaje, Zainab Ismaa'eel and Rahoul Naik.

Inspire Awards are small grants handed out to enterprising young people by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

The charity launched the awards scheme to help young people fulfill their potential in music, sports, business and community work.

Eighteen-year-old Sagar Haria, from Belgrave, is one of the latest raft of Inspire Awards recipients. He's been granted £300 to help achieve his ambition of launching a new financial website.

"The website is called Mr Curzon, because Curzon Street in London is associated with some of the world's most well-known financiers," Sagar explains. "As well as offering news on business, financial markets and politics, it will have a lifestyle section, and interviews with business leaders.

"The Inspire Award is key to helping me set up the site, because it means I can arrange hosting, get a business email and attract advertisers. I'm really grateful for the support from JHMT."

Gregor Sinclair, 21, from Leicester, has received a £200 award to help develop his skills as a videographer and director.

Gregor wants to set himself up to help local businesses make adverts, as well as covering events and developing creative art with other local film-makers.

"I need professional equipment so I can make really high-quality adverts and short films," says Gregor. "The Inspire Award will make this possible for me."

Budding photographer Kimiri Singh, from Newfoundpool, has been given a £150 Inspire Award to help her take her photography to the next level.

The 21-year-old says: "The Inspire grant will help me purchase some vital pieces of equipment. It means that I can build my portfolio be more creative and to get onto the right course, or into the right line of work."

Eighteen-year-old Keltoum Baddaje, from Spinney Hills, has a burning ambition to set up his own media streaming channel.

"The channel will be based on entertaining others and raising money when it is big enough," says Keltoum. "Watching live streams and asking for advice from the streamer has personally helped me to overcome a lot, and that sense of connection is something I want to give to my viewers too.

"The Inspire Award will allow me to buy the specialist equipment needed to kick-start my project, and for that I'm truly grateful."

Zainab Ismaa'eel, 18, from Leicester, wants to set up his own business buying and selling leather bags. He hopes one day to design his own range.

"My £150 Inspire Award will support me to set up my business," he says. "It will also motivate me to be successful, because I want to make the JHMT proud."

Twenty-year-old Rahoul Naik, from Leicester, has a passion for music and has set up Frequency 21, a music magazine run by and for young people.

Launched in January this year, Frequency 21 is hitting almost 8,000 views a month and has attracted some great writers and interviewees.

"The next stage includes setting up a new website for the magazine, which requires further resources," says Rahoul. "Our £300 Inspire grant will help us with our first aim of getting 20,000 views a week. It will allow us to develop a professional website, top SEO functions and a solid marketing plan."

Inspire Awards project lead Simon Taylor said: "The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust is always looking to support young entrepreneurs who have a passion and a 'big' idea. We've recently received a number of applications from the next generation of Leicester's entrepreneurs, and we're delighted to support them with their creative, professional and exciting ventures.

"We hope that in a small way, we're helping these young people to take their first steps in achieving their ambitions. We hope their ventures will be a great success and an inspiration to others."

Inspire Awards were set up in memory of Rothley teenager Joe Humphries, who tragically died of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). Undiagnosed heart conditions like SADS can affect seemingly fit and healthy young people.

The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust works tirelessly to raise awareness of, and help prevent, sudden heart deaths. To find out more about the Trust's work and the Inspire Awards, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

A Huge Thank You - Rothley Park Cricket Club 'Party in the Park' in aid of JHMT

A Huge Thank You - Rothley Park Cricket Club 'Party in the Park' in aid of JHMT

A HUGE THANK YOU!

At Party in the Park you raised £1465 by coming along and having a great time. As a result you are helping us to:

  • train, in partnership with Heartwize RTP, thousands (15,000 to date ) of school children, the vital life skills of CPR and how to use a AED, in readiness for if someone collapses with a sudden cardiac arrest.
  • through the Joe's Mini HeartStart for sports scheme aimed at offering sports club members including players, officials and supporters the chance to learn cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and how to use a defibrillator.
  • to make people across Leicestershire & Rutland, the UK and in other countries aware of the possible symptoms, signs and concerns regarding SADS.
  • to provide grants for defibrillator boxes for sports clubs and community groups and advice on where best these should be placed (ie. in a cabinet so that they may be fully accessible 24/7) and training on familiarisation of defibs to take the 'fear factor' away from their use.
  • fund small grants to talented young people who need help to reach their potential, something so cruelly denied to the young victims of SADS. To date over 50 awards have been made to help our young realise their dreams.
  • to deliver annual educational conferences and learning events delivered by leading medical practitioners and experts throughout the county to promote the understanding and reduce the incidence of SADS.

But there is so much more to do and this is only possible through the willingness of kind hearted and talented volunteers and funds raised so generously donated to help us achieve our goals and create a heart safe community for all.

Thank You

JHMT

To view the pic gallery of the day go to: https://www.facebook.com/JHMTorguk/photos/?tab=album&album_id=790071394467876

LCC Parks Staff Get CPR Training & Learn How to Use an AED with Support from JHMT

LCC Parks Staff Get CPR Training & Learn How to Use an AED with Support from JHMT

STAFF working in the city council's parks services are being trained in life-saving skills.

Defibrillators have recently been installed in many of the city's parks and open spaces, including Abbey, Braunstone, Evington, Humberstone, Spinney Hill, Watermead and Victoria parks, and at Aylestone Hall Gardens as well as Rushey Fields and Cossington recreation grounds.

Now parks staff, volunteers and members of the community are being given training so that they know how to use the automated external defibrillators (AEDs) if the need arises.

They will also learn vital cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques, so that they know what to do if someone collapses in suspected cardiac arrest.

The training is being provided for free by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), which works to raise awareness of, and prevent, sudden heart deaths.

The most recent session took place at Abbey Park on Tuesday 23 August.

Deputy city mayor Cllr Rory Palmer, who leads on health integration for Leicester, said: "Our goal is to have a defibrillator in all our parks and open spaces – we made a manifesto commitment to do this.

"A defibrillator is a vital piece of life-saving equipment, and it's good to see them becoming a more common sight across cities, towns and villages in our region and beyond.

"But what's equally important is that people know how to use a defibrillator and perform CPR if the need arises.

"That's why we're pleased to be working with the JHMT to ensure as many people as possible learn these vital life-saving skills."

Assistant city mayor Cllr Piara Singh Clair, who has responsibility for culture, leisure and sport, said: "I'm very pleased that parks staff and friends of parks groups are learning these skills and that we already have so many defibrillators in place. We'll continue this work and we will continue to work with charities like the JHMT to raise awareness of the importance of learning how to save a life."

Dr Mike Ferguson from the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust said: "Sadly, in the UK, there are 60,000 cardiac arrests every year in the community. Half of these are witnessed, often by family and friends, but the survival rate is less than 10 per cent.

"Only 20 per cent of victims are in a 'shockable rhythm', which is treatable by defibrillation, by the time an ambulance arrives. Survival is much more likely when a shockable rhythm is present.

"The proportion of people in a shockable rhythm could be increased if more cardiac arrest victims received immediate and effective CPR from bystanders. That's why we're so keen to provide this vitally important training and make sure as many people as possible know what to do to increase someone's chances of survival.

"With cardiac arrest, it is better for a bystander to do something than to do nothing."

To find out more about Leicester's parks and green spaces, visit www.leicester.gov.uk/parks

http://www.leicester.gov.uk/news/news-features/defibrillator-training-rolled-out-across-leicesters-parks/

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/parks-staff-in-leicester-being-trained-to-save-lives/story-29658211-detail/story.html

( Press release courtesy of Leicester City Council's Press Office)

Ahmad is 50th Young Person to Get an Inspire Award

Ahmad is 50th Young Person to Get an Inspire Award

A 13-YEAR-OLD martial arts enthusiast from Leicester has become the fiftieth young person to benefit from a charity award.

Ahmad Saleh, a member of the CKI martial arts club, has been granted a £300 Inspire Award to help him fulfill his ambition to represent Team England at the World Karate Championships in Portugal this month (Oct).

Inspire Awards are handed out to deserving young people by the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), a local charity set up in memory of Rothley teenager Joe, who collapsed and died of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) while out on a training run.

Since the Inspire Awards' inception in June 2014, a total of 56 small grants – of up to £500 – have been handed out to deserving recipients.

Six of these have been second awards to existing recipients, making Ahmad the fiftieth young person to benefit from the grants scheme.

Ahmad's award comes as the JHMT marks SADS Awareness Week (1-8 October), a week of activities to help promote better understanding of sudden heart deaths.

Ahmad shared a love of martial arts with Joe Humphries, who was also a member of the CKI club.

Ahmad said: "This £300 grant will help me to represent and hopefully win a medal for Team England at the world championships.

"I trained with Joe for many years. He was a very enthusiastic and talented sportsman, who always supported us and was an inspiration to us all.

"The grant will give me a chance to inspire other people to do their best, in the same way that Joe inspired me."

Yusuf Saleh MBE, Ahmad's father, said: "The Inspire grant will help Ahmad to continue to represent the English national karate team at an international level. Last year, he won three medals at the world championships and this has contributed to others trying to emulate him and follow in his footsteps."

Ahmad added: "At our martial arts school, we already actively raise awareness of sudden heart deaths and promote the work of the JHMT.

"Earlier this year, we took part in the JHMT's Mini HeartStart for Sports programme. We learned CPR and how to use a defibrillator."

Inspire lead Simon Taylor said: "This is an excellent application from a very talented and committed young man. That this is the 50th individual to whom we have made an award and also a member of Joe's former club is very significant to us and something we are absolutely delighted to support. We very much hope Ahmad achieves his medal hopes."

Martin Johnson, former England rugby captain and patron of the JHMT, said: "Ahmad is a credit to his club and we're very proud to support him, as we are all the young people who have received Inspire Awards from the Joe Humphries Trust.

"It's fantastic news that 50 local young people have benefited from our scheme to help them fulfill their ambitions.

"We all want the best for our kids and for them to reach their goals. Sadly, this is something Joe Humphries was unable to do, but thanks to initiatives like the Inspire Awards and SADS Week, we can really make a difference to people's lives, in Joe's honour."

SADS Awareness Week events have included a series of public-access lectures, CPR training sessions and the launch of an annual photography competition in memory of Joe.

To find out more about the JHMT and its work, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

You can also follow SADS Awareness Week events and activities on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/jhmtorguk or @jhmt.org.uk

and on the JHMT website at jhmt.org.uk/sads-week

http://www.loughboroughecho.net/news/local-news/50th-grant-awarded-joes-charity-12006772

October 2016
Don’t Go Breaking Your Heart – SADS Awareness Week

Don’t Go Breaking Your Heart – SADS Awareness Week

SADS Awareness Week will take place from 1-8 October 2016.

SADS stands for Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome, a deadly and often hidden heart condition. In Britain, 12 young people aged 12-35 years old die each week from undiagnosed heart problems like SADS.

The JHMT was set up after the death of Rothley teenager Joe Humphries in 2012. Joe died from SADS while out on a training jog near his home.

As part of SADS Week, various fundraising events, CPR training sessions and a photography competition will take place.

There will also be three free lectures to help promote understanding of sudden heart deaths, SADS, and a new poster campaign with the taglines 'Don't go breaking your heart' and 'Time to save a life'.

The posters include some shocking statistics – that 60,000 cardiac arrests occur in the community every year, with half of these witnessed by someone, often a friend or loved one.

This year's SADS Week posters are being distributed to GP surgeries, schools and public venues across the city and county. They are also available to download from jhmt.org.uk/sads-week

By learning hands-on CPR, people can help to improve survival rates, because at the moment, only 3,000 people survive.

Leicester City Women's Football Club and GNG Leicester Football Club, which also trains at the Riverside site, are both committed to creating a heartsafe environment for their players, coaches and everyone associated with their clubs.

The session will take place as part of JHMT's specialist training programme, Joe's Mini HeartStart for Sports.

The training ensures that everyone associated with a sports team – including coaches, staff and players ­– knows the basic skills needed to help save a life.

The week will also see the launch of this year's Joe's Photography Competition at De Lisle College, which was Joe's school.

The annual competition, which attracted more than 100 entries per year in 2013, 2014 and 2015, encourages the talents of De Lisle students as part of their Creative and Active Week. A professional photographer will then judge the entries later in the year.

SADS week will round off with a celebration of the Trust's Inspire Awards scheme and a charity bike ride to Rutland Water by Trust supporters.

Martin Johnson, former England rugby captain and patron of the JHMT, said:

"The work goes on to ensure as many people as is possible learn more about these deadly heart conditions, which can strike seemingly fit and healthy young people without any warning.

"That's why I'm proud to back the JHMT. We need to change the shocking statistics that see 12 young people die each week from these silent killers.

"The JHMT is committed to raising awareness of sudden heart deaths, and its latest hard-hitting poster campaign will certainly help to do this.

"But its work doesn't stop there. JHMT is also taking the message directly to young people and to grassroots sports clubs, ensuring that as many people as possible are trained in these vital lifesaving skills.

"This training can make the difference between life and death if someone collapses in a cardiac emergency. What could be more important than that?"

Full house for local charity’s lecture on cardiac awareness

Full house for local charity’s lecture on cardiac awareness

LOCAL people flocked to an awareness-raising lecture and hands-on CPR training session held as part of SADS Awareness Week.

The lecture was part of the University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL)'s monthly Marvellous Medicine series, and took place last night (5th Oct) at Leicester General Hospital.

It was organised by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) as part of a week of activities to help promote better understanding of sudden heart deaths.

SADS stands for sudden arrhythmic death syndrome, a deadly and often hidden heart condition. In Britain, 12 young people aged 12-35 years old die each week from undiagnosed heart problems like SADS.

During the lecture, speaker Dr Ffion Davies explained what SADS is, and why acting fast is so vital when responding to someone who has collapsed in cardiac arrest.

Dr Davies, who is medical advisor to the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and consultant in A&E at University Hospitals of Leicester, said: "It's fantastic that so many people came along to our first lecture during SADS Awareness Week, to learn more about why young people can die of a heart problem. We were delighted to see so many participating in the CPR training, and becoming competent within minutes.

"What we want to see is people who have suffered a cardiac arrest in Leicestershire arriving at hospital sitting up and looking well, because someone had the courage and the knowledge to do CPR, and get hold of a defibrillator within those precious minutes. The interest in this lecture shows that people want to know more about SADS and understand why CPR is so important".

The lecture was followed by a very well-attended CPR and defibrillator training session hosted by the JHMT.

SADS Awareness Week, which runs from 1-8 October, also includes two further free lectures. Tonight's (6 Oct), at Loughborough University, looks at sudden cardiac death in sport. It will offer university staff, students and members of the public the chance to learn CPR skills.

And on Friday 7 October, there will be a talk for health professionals at Leicester Royal Infirmary at 1pm, to increase their knowledge about SADS.

To find out more about the JHMT and its work, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

You can also follow SADS Awareness Week events and activities on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/jhmtorguk or @jhmt.org.uk