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JHMT Highlights

Another ‘eventful year’ of JHMT fundraising and awareness activities to break the silence on #SADS – Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome

Karate Champions Dedicate Their Wins to Joe

Karate Champions Dedicate Their Wins to Joe

THREE karate competitors who have excelled on the world stage have dedicated their most recent wins to the memory of a Rothley teenager.

Ahmad Saleh, Yusuf Saleh and Subayre Shire from the CKI school of martial arts, in Leicester, travelled to Portugal last month to compete in the WKC karate, kickboxing and martial arts championships.

They came back with an impressive haul of medals between them, including gold for 13-year-old Ahmad, who successfully defended his world title in the kids' points fighting over 50kg category.

The accolade is Ahmad's seventh world title – but he didn't stop there, also bringing home a silver in the unified weight division and a bronze in the light contact over 50kg category.

Yusuf Saleh MBE – Ahmad's dad – won three gold, two silvers and a bronze medal, while 20-year-old Subayre came away with a gold in the national men's team event and two silvers.

Now all three have dedicated their wins to Joe Humphries, who used to train at the club. Joe was 14 when he died from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) in 2012, whilst out running near his home in Rothley.

Since that time, Joe's family and friends have worked tirelessly to campaign for a better understanding of sudden, unexpected cardiac death in young people, and have campaigned for compulsory CPR training and defibrillators in schools, community venues and sports clubs.

Through their charity, the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), they also launched the Inspire Awards, a small grants scheme that helps young people to fulfil their ambitions in sport, art, business or community enterprises.

Ahmad was recently granted a £300 Inspire award to help cover his travel costs to compete at the world championships. He became the fiftieth young person to get an award from the scheme.

Ahmad said: "We were overjoyed and shocked that we managed to win so many medals. We all worked very hard. Our goal now is to hopefully be able to defend our titles next year and continue to perform well.

"Joe Humphries was my friend and my team-mate. We wanted to dedicate our medals to him and to the Trust for helping so many young people like me."

CKI coach Ismail Saleh added: "I'm immensely proud of the hard work all my students put in and this year is special for us, as it's 30 years since the club started.

"I was also very proud to be Joe's coach since he was very young, so we are very happy to dedicate these wins to Joe and his family, who have always supported our club."

Chair of the JHMT Steve Humphries said: "We are really touched by the wonderful gesture of Joe's friends at CKI martial arts club for dedicating this year's success at the world championships in honour of him. It is also fitting that the 50th Inspire Award has helped Ahmad take another important step along the way to fulfil his potential as an outstanding young sportsman and role model for the club and Leicester."

- To find out more about SADS and the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust, please visit www.jhmt.org.uk

November 2016
Medical Lead from Local Heart Charity Takes Part in Prestigious Conference

Medical Lead from Local Heart Charity Takes Part in Prestigious Conference

A LOCAL heart charity's medical lead took part in a prestigious conference this week.

Dr Ffion Davies, who is one of the medical leads for the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), is also a consultant in A&E at Leicester Royal Infirmary. She spoke via internet link at the British Congenital Cardiac Association's conference, which was held in Nottingham on 24 November.

The conference usually attracts around 300 medical professionals and specialists from all parts of the UK and overseas.

Dr Davies said: "I was delighted to have the opportunity to show healthcare staff from all over the country the amazing work the JHMT charity is doing in getting schoolchildren trained in CPR and getting defibrillators into public places in Leicestershire."

Dr Suhair Shebani, consultant paediatric cardiologist at the Glenfield Hospital, who led the conference's organising committee, said: "We were really excited to be hosting this meeting, despite the current external pressures on our service. It's a real opportunity to reaffirm our place at the centre of the UK's congenital heart disease map and is a proud moment for Leicester hospitals and the whole of the congenital cardiac network in the East Midlands."

The JHMT was set up after the tragic death of Rothley teenager Joe Humphries, 14, from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). As well as a wide range of awareness-raising and fundraising work, the charity helps to train people in CPR and defibrillator familiarisation, holds an annual SADS Awareness Week and organises a medical conference, in conjunction with Leicester's hospitals.

Find out more about the work of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust at www.jhmt.org.uk.

Robert Smyth Students Help Promote Vital Work of Local Charity

Robert Smyth Students Help Promote Vital Work of Local Charity

STUDENTS from a county school have been using their advertising and marketing skills to support a local charity.

Sixth-formers at the Robert Smyth Academy, in Market Harborough, have been creating promotional campaigns for The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) as part of their coursework for AS-level media.

It's an annual media project that brings together the JHMT and Robert Smyth students, with this year being the third year the project has taken place.

Steve Humphries, chair of the Trust, visited the school to tell students about the charity's vital work raising awareness of SADS – sudden arrhythmic death syndrome – and sudden heart deaths.

He also explained how, by learning a few simple lifesaving skills like CPR and how to use a defibrillator, you can be the difference between life and death.

The Trust campaigns for a better understanding of conditions like SADS, which can occur without warning, especially in younger people. It also helps to provide defibrillators for communities and training in CPR for sports clubs.

The students were asked to come up with a promotional campaign for the Trust, consisting of a storyboard for a TV advert and three magazine-style posters. Steve then returned to the college to give them feedback on their work.

Steve said: "The brief was for the students to choose an element of JHMT's work – such as why its vitally important to learn CPR and how to use a defibrillator. The students then carry out their own research on a particular area of their choice.

"Some of their work is then used in the school to raise awareness, and we use it within the charity too."

Maria Sherwin, head of film and media at Robert Smyth Academy, said: "We were proud once again to work with JHMT to develop students' advertising skills. The students have enjoyed the process immensely.

"Not only did they benefit from being able to apply their knowledge and understanding of charity advertising to real-world contexts, but they are also keen to share their awareness of SADS and life-saving techniques with their peers."

Former England rugby captain and patron of the JHMT, Martin Johnson, was a student at Robert Smyth. He said: "This is a great project and I'm really pleased that the students got the chance to work closely with the Trust and find out more about its vital work raising awareness of sudden heart deaths that can affect fit and healthy young people."

December 2016
Leicestershire County Cricket Club are Proud to be Launching Heart Awareness in Cricket (HAC)

Leicestershire County Cricket Club are Proud to be Launching Heart Awareness in Cricket (HAC)

HAC will raise awareness about the problem of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and the importance of members of the public learning how to respond if they should witness an event.

Following on from the successful CPR raise awareness day during a Specsavers County Championship match against Sussex in 2016, Leicestershire CCC have teamed up with the Heartwize charity and the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) to raise awareness and teach basic life support skills to cricketers and those involved in the game.

Activities will focus on teaching people how to recognise a cardiac arrest and how to respond by immediately calling for help, starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and ensuring prompt access to an automated external defibrillator (AED). These basic skills can greatly improve the victim's chances of survival.

The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the home, so it is important that everyone in the community knows how to respond but events can be triggered by intense physical activity, so ensuring that bystanders in the sporting arena know how to respond is particularly important.

To book your place at the event, please go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/leicestershire-ccc-launch-event-for-heart-awareness-in-cricket-tickets-30951128659

Description

17:00 - Doors open

17:50 - Everyone to be in seats

18:00 - Welcome

18:15 - What is Cardiac Arrest?

18:25 - Joe Humphries Memorial Trust presentation

18:35 - Heartwize presentation

18:40 - Leicestershire CCC - what are we going to achieve?

19:00-21:15 - Training/Interactive Sessions/Meeting Exhibitors

January 2017
Five Inspiring Young People are Latest in Line for Awards

Five Inspiring Young People are Latest in Line for Awards

AN ASPIRING DJ, a charity fund-raiser and a trio of promising sportspeople have become the latest recipients of the Inspire Awards.

Inspire is run by the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), a local charity which works to raise awareness and reduce the incidence of sudden heart deaths.

It was set up following the death of Rothley teenager Joe Humphries, who died of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) while out jogging near his home.

Inspire Awards help local young people to fulfill their ambitions – something young Joe was tragically not able to do.

Eighteen-year-old Megan Morrison, from Quorn, Leicestershire, will use her £200 Inspire grant to compete in swimming on an international stage. Among her accolades are winning gold for 200m breast-stroke at the UK school games and achieving qualifying times for the British championships every year since 2010. Her next goal is to try to qualify for selection to the next Commonwealth Games in Australia 2018.

Megan said: "The Inspire grant will help towards the cost of international meets. Each year the cost of swimming increases and I would not be able to pursue my dream without the help of grants such as these."

Katie Twelves, 18, from Stapleton, Leicestershire, has a real passion for tennis. "My highlight of 2016 was finishing second in the Leicestershire County Championships – and in 2017, I want to win it," she says. "This year, I'm going to La Manga in Spain to train at a performance academy. My £150 Inspire Award will benefit me so much as it will greatly help towards making sure I'm ready to compete at my very best."

Harry Redfern, 15, from Wigston, Leicester, is already an accomplished fundraiser, raising an amazing £2,000 on a recent 142-mile Coast to Coast cycle challenge. He donated £1,000 of this to Rainbows, and is putting £1,000 towards a trip to Tanzania which he has planned for the summer.

While in Tanzania, Harry will be taking part in voluntary work, building homes and schools for local communities. He'll also be helping with animal conservation work.

Harry's £250 Inspire award will go towards his Tanzanian trip. "I feel extremely proud to have been recognised for my work," he said. "I'm really enthusiastic about going out to help other communities and this grant will help me to hit my fundraising target."

Hannah Seager, from Loughborough, Leicestershire, is 15 and has loved running ever since primary school. She's previously won the secondary schools cross country league, and came third in the National English Championships, meaning she also got to represent England at an international level.

It hasn't all been plain sailing, though, and in 2015 Hannah suffered injuries which put her out of action for nine months. She's since recovered, and is currently battling to fully regain her form.

Hannah said: "Getting this £150 grant from Inspire will help me to achieve my aim of getting back into the top 10 in national competition. I'll use it to buy new footwear and clothing to help with my winter training."

Twenty-year-old Joel Birkett is an aspiring music producer and DJ from Leicester. He's released an album on popular web platform Bandcamp, and it's attracted the attention of Joe Muggs, a music journalist, who featured Joel's work as a recommended purchase.

His £150 Inspire award will go towards releasing the album on vinyl. "This is the next step to give me more credibility and take my work to the next level," he says.

Simon Taylor, Inspire lead for the JHMT, said: "We're delighted to be able to support these five young people. They all show enormous ambition, resourcefulness, determination and enthusiasm and we want to reward them for that.

"We wish them every success and look forward to hearing about their future achievements."

February 2017
SADS Awareness Conference 2017 Will Again Put Sudden Heart Deaths in Young People Firmly on the Agenda for Doctors & Nurses

SADS Awareness Conference 2017 Will Again Put Sudden Heart Deaths in Young People Firmly on the Agenda for Doctors & Nurses

HOW do we get more defibrillators and CPR training into our communities? And how can we ensure more victims of cardiac arrest survive because a member of the public took action? How do we spot the warning signs of these conditions?

These are the sorts of questions that will be addressed at this year's SADS awareness conference, organised by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) in conjunction with the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

It takes place on Thursday 2nd March at the King Power Stadium.

SADS stands for sudden arrhythmic death syndrome. It's part of a group of subtle heart diseases that claim the lives of 12 teenagers and young adults, aged 12-35, every week in the UK. Some conditions causing SADS affect whole families.

The conference and study day is aimed at healthcare professionals in sport, hospital or community care.

Dr Ffion Davies, JHMT medical lead and consultant in A&E at Leicester's Hospitals, said: "I want to see more people diagnosed before they have a cardiac arrest. If someone does suffer a cardiac arrest, I'd like to see them arriving at A&E sitting up and talking because they've already received the right help – that is, access to a defibrillator and someone who has learned CPR and saved their life."

The conference will feature an opening address from Martin Johnson, former England rugby captain and patron of the JHMT.

Martin said: "The JHMT's work to raise awareness of sudden heart deaths is vitally important – not just among the general public, but also among medical staff.

"This conference is a chance for professionals to come together and discuss how, by working with the JHMT, they can put Leicestershire at the forefront of awareness, research and action when it comes to sudden heart deaths. We want to make an impact, make a difference – and events like this one are an essential part of our plan."

Registration fees are £70 for doctors, £40 for nurses, paramedics, ambulance technicians and physios, and £20 for students.

Bookings for this conference are now closed.

For enquiries, please contact jhmt@jhmt.org.uk

See Also: http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/joe-humphries-trust-conference-to-address-sads-deaths/story-30081640-detail/st

DMU students put in a 'champion effort' at charity football fest to tackle SADS

DMU students put in a 'champion effort' at charity football fest to tackle SADS

A HUGE THANKS to all members of the De Montfort Mens and Womens football teams for being such 'GREAT SPORTS' at this year's annual DMU mens and womens football tournament

'A HUGE THANKS to all members of the De Montfort Mens and Womens football teams for being such 'GREAT SPORTS' at this year's annual DMU mens and womens football tournament to help Joe's Trust with its goal to raise awareness of #SADS and reduce the incidence of young people, 12 - 35 years old dying from undiagnosed heart conditions.

We are delighted the event was so well attended by members and friends involved with the men's and women's football clubs. Once again congratulations to the Team DMU organizing committee led by Elliott Watts who worked so hard to make the event possible and the forty two teams who took part in the competition.

The JHMT/DSU partnership goes from strength to strength as the vital work goes on to create a heart safe community across the University campus. As shown by the strength and depth of this year's JHMT team demonstrates how important the DSU efforts are so much appreciated and important in the Trust's ongoing fight to reduce the incidence of young people, 12 - 35 years old dying from undiagnosed heart conditions.'

Thanks also to James (Butch) and his team at Goals, Evington for being such supportive and welcoming hosts and helping making this possible. A BIG THANK YOU you also to members of the JHMT Select team who gave up their time and support to give the event another actioned packed opening match.

Thanks also to Leicester Mercury and BBC Radio Leicester for the local media coverage and JHMT photographer Stephen Baum for capturing some of the highlights on camera.'

On behalf of JHMT by Steve Humphries- Chair of The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (Joe's DAD)

Photos of the Event: https://www.facebook.com/JHMTorguk/photos/?tab=album&album_id=901018103373204

More Information: http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/watch-all-star-leicester-team-take-on-de-montfort-university-students-in-charity-football-match/story-30108910-detail/story.html

Martin Johnson CBE Opens SADS Conference 2017 - Putting Sudden  Heart Deaths in Young People Firmly on the Agenda

Martin Johnson CBE Opens SADS Conference 2017 - Putting Sudden Heart Deaths in Young People Firmly on the Agenda

RUGBY legend Martin Johnson CBE has helped put sudden heart deaths in young people on the agenda by opening the SADS Conference 2017.

Martin welcomed delegates working in sports, hospitals and the wider community as they attended the fourth SADS Awareness Conference, held at the King Power Stadium in Leicester on 2 March.

The conference attracted expert speakers from across the country. It addressed questions such as how do we get more defibrillators and CPR training into our communities? And how can we ensure more victims of cardiac arrest survive because a member of the public took action? How do we spot the warning signs of these conditions?

The conference was organised by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) in conjunction with the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

SADS stands for sudden arrhythmic death syndrome. It's part of a group of subtle heart diseases that claim the lives of 12 teenagers and young adults, aged 12-35, every week in the UK. Some conditions causing SADS affect whole families.

The conference and study day was aimed at healthcare professionals in sport, hospital and community care.

Dr Ffion Davies, JHMT medical lead and consultant in A&E at Leicester's Hospitals, said: "I want to see more people diagnosed before they have a cardiac arrest. If someone does suffer a cardiac arrest, I'd like to see them arriving at A&E sitting up and talking because they've already received the right help – that is, access to a defibrillator and someone who has learned CPR and saved their life."

Former England rugby captain and patron of the JHMT, Martin Johnson CBE, added: "The JHMT's work to raise awareness of sudden heart deaths is vitally important – not just among the general public, but also among medical staff.

"This conference is a chance for professionals to come together and discuss how, by working with the JHMT, they can put Leicestershire at the forefront of awareness, research and action when it comes to sudden heart deaths. We want to make an impact, make a difference – and events like this one are an essential part of our plan."

For more information on the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

More Information: http://www.pukaarnews.com/rugby-legend-opens-sads-conference-2017/18119/

March 2017
Quorn Juniors Football Club Get 'Hands On' to Learn CPR - Thanks to the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust

Quorn Juniors Football Club Get 'Hands On' to Learn CPR - Thanks to the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust

ANOTHER Leicestershire sports club has taken steps to be better prepared and equipped should ever the need arise to deal with a cardiac emergency.

A group of 15 coaches and staff from Quorn Juniors Football Club has become the latest to learn vital life-saving skills courtesy of local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

The club has recently had a new community-access public defibrillator installed, close to both the club's football pitches and Rawlins Academy in Quorn. Club funds of £700 were provided for the defibrillator to be installed; JHMT then provided a £300 grant for the club to buy an external defibrillator box.

Now club members have learnt cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques and how to use a defibrillator, thanks to training sessions organised by JHMT.

The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust was set up to raise awareness of undiagnosed heart conditions such as SADS (sudden arrhythmic death syndrome), which can strike seemingly fit and healthy young people without any warning.

As part of this, the charity is passionate about ensuring young people participate in sports in a 'heart safe' environment, where people know what symptoms to look out for, are equipped with basic CPR skills, there is quick access to defibrillator and, crucially, people around who know how to use it.

SADS can sometimes – but not always – be triggered by the physical exertion of sport. It can cause any underlying problem to show up.

The Joe's Mini Heart Start For Sports Clubs training was delivered by former cardiac nurse Alan Harrison-White from JHMT, following the principles of the British Heart Foundation's HeartStart programme, which teaches people emergency life support skills.

Scott Sharman, Quorn Juniors' under-7s coach, said: "It's great to have this defibrillator on site because it gives everyone, including members and parents, added reassurance that should there ever be a cardiac emergency, the club is prepared and equipped to deal with a life-threatening situation.

"Because it's in a secure cabinet on an outside wall, the defibrillator will also be available 24/7 to the community in an emergency. But it's just as important that people know how to use it.

"We were really pleased when the Trust offered to help us to get trained up in CPR and how to use a defibrillator."

Alan Harrison-White from the trust added: "We teach a variety of emergency life support skills. They are not difficult to learn, but they really could mean the vital difference between life and death. We want to see as many people as possible who are involved in local sports clubs getting trained up in this way."

Joe Humphries died in October 2012, aged 14, whilst returning home from a training run near his home in Rothley. Since then, his family and friends have campaigned tirelessly to raise awareness of SADS and for more people to be trained in vital life-saving skills.

Any sports clubs wanting to register their interest in the free Joe's Mini Heart Start For Sports Clubs training can email charles.poole@ntlworld.com

More information on the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust can be found at www.jhmt.org.uk

DSU unveil first public defibrillator at the heart of campus

DSU unveil first public defibrillator at the heart of campus

De Montfort Students' Union (DSU) have unveiled the first public access defibrillator on the De Montfort University (DMU) campus with the help of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

The move, which will make the heart of campus a safer place for students, staff and the public alike, is thanks to DSU's unique partnership with the Trust, set up after the death of 14-year-old Joe from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) in 2012.

The defibrillator was officially unveiled at the Campus Centre on Friday by Joe's father and Trust founder Steve Humphries, Joe's sister Lauren and DSU President Dan Winney alongside VP Student Activities Ahtesham Mahmood.

Steve, who is also an honorary life member of the students' union, said:

"One lost Joe is one too many. We know that right now the statistics aren't very good.

"We know that SADS can affect young people, and so this defibrillator is just another key marker in helping create a safer community.

"This is a fantastic statement and, most importantly, driven by our students."

Statistics show that 12 young people aged between 12 and 35 in the UK die each week from SADS, a group of lethal heart diseases which can cause sudden cardiac death. If CPR is started immediately, with the assistance of a defibrillator such as the model now fitted to the side of the Campus Centre, the majority of victims could be saved.

DSU's partnership with JHMT was formed in 2013 under the direction of then VP Student Activities, Chris Mutton, who attended the same Leicester school as Joe and Lauren. The link-up between the two organisations continues, with sports clubs and other student groups regularly raising money for the Trust through star-studded sporting fixtures and other fundraising events.

Dan Winney, President of DSU, said:

"This is an essential partnership, as both DSU and JHMT have the same aims in keeping everyone safe. To have this defibrillator is a real statement, and while we hope that the worst doesn't happen, this shows we are ready to act.

"This is just the start, and we will continue to work with JHMT to train student leaders and make our campus heart safe."

Joe's sister Lauren was also on hand at the launch of the state-of-the-art equipment, and she explained that it was reminding her father 'not to forget about students' that kick-started the Trust's push into universities across the UK.

"I was studying in Newcastle when it happened,"

"I was conscious of the fact that SADS doesn't just affect Joe's age group – I've got the symptoms too – so I said we need to think about students, too.

"This equipment, more than anything, is an awareness-raiser to help make people more familiar with what it is and when it should be used."

Dr Mike Ferguson, the Trust's medical lead, added:

"DSU has, over the years, been tremendously supportive and embraced the idea that all public areas need access to lifesaving equipment. JHMT wishes to recognise the support given by the students by donating this up-to-date defibrillator and cabinet."

In an emergency, users dial 999 and are given the code to the cabinet – which also relays instructions on how to properly administer CPR.

But a single public access defibrillator on campus is just the start, as explained Ahtesham Mahmood, current VP Student Activities and President-elect.

"I think our student groups have really pushed this through," he remarked.

"As the regional British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) chair, I will be taking the opportunity to roll initiatives like this out nationally, and I want to conduct a facility audit to find out where equipment is available and how we can do better.

"It's not just at a local level, but an example of how DSU are looking to work with JHMT in trying to spearhead a change on a national stage."

More Information: https://www.demontfortsu.com/news/article/8481/DSU-unveil-first-public-defib-at-the-heart-of-campus/

April 2017
Leicester Market Fundraisers on Adrenaline Fuelled Challenge

Leicester Market Fundraisers on Adrenaline Fuelled Challenge

TWO keen fund-raisers from Leicester Market have completed an adrenaline-fuelled zipwire challenge to raise money for a local charity.

Rob Manley, a senior markets officer at Leicester Market, and stallholder Michael Gibson, from F Gibson & Son fishmongers, raised more than £1,000 by taking on ZipWorld, in north Wales – billed as 'the longest zip line in Europe and the fastest in the world'.

They were raising money for local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), which works to raise awareness of, and help prevent, sudden heart deaths, particularly in young people.

Rob said: "Over the past 14 or so years, together with the traders, I've done pretty much every fund-raising activity you can think of, from biking to Skeggy to running marathons. I reckon I've raised between £8,000-£10,000 for local charities.

"JHMT as a local charity seemed like an ideal one to raise money for. All of the stallholders, and friends and family, have been really generous in helping us to raise money for this great cause.

"The zipwire was awesome, albeit a bit worrying on the way up, when the lorry that takes you up there goes up through the clouds!

"It was a pretty nerve-wracking experience, but we survived – and even managed to enjoy it."

Steve Humphries, chair of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust, said: "This was a great challenge to take on and we're really honoured to be chosen as the charity to benefit from Rob and Michael's efforts.

"All of the money raised will go towards our vital work, which includes helping to provide public-access defibrillators and ensuring that community sports clubs receive CPR training.

"Measures like these can help us to make an impact on sudden heart deaths, because if someone knows CPR and starts it immediately, and a defibrillator can be got to a person within eight minutes, the majority of people would survive."

As well as providing CPR training and defibrillator equipment, the JHMT runs an awards scheme, Inspire, for young people, and holds an annual conference to keep sudden heart deaths in young people on the top of the medical agenda.

To find out more about the charity's work and how you can support it, visit www.jhmt.org.uk.

Or follow the Trust on Twitter and Facebook:

https://twitter.com/jhmtorguk

www.facebook.com/JHMTorguk

Nick Gets Ready to Run for the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust

Nick Gets Ready to Run for the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust

A KEEN swimmer who has taken up running is preparing to run the London Marathon in aid of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust.

Nick White, from Loughborough, has already raised £1,900 in sponsorship ahead of the event, on April 23 – so now all that's left to do is run it!

It will be the first time that Nick, 45, has ever run a marathon.

"I chose the Joe Humphries Trust because I am a keen amateur swimmer and swim for Loughborough Town Swimming Club, where Joe was a member, making his trust particularly important to me," Nick said.

"The work they do could save the life of one of the young sportspeople I train with on a regular basis.

"I've been running for about two years now, and I've been training hard, four to five days a week for the past three months. It's been hard to keep up with my swimming and fit in the long runs as well.

"I'd be really happy to finish in under four hours, but I'm more interested in enjoying the experience and the atmosphere on the day. My partner, Karen, and son Alfie will be cheering me on.

"I am very proud and honored to be running for this wonderful charity, and would like to thank everyone at the Trust for giving me the opportunity. I would also like to thank everyone at Charnwood Athletics Club and coach Stuart Walker for all the help and advice they have given me."

The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) was set up in memory of Leicestershire teenager Joe Humphries, who collapsed and died while out jogging. Joe was a victim of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) – a group of lethal heart conditions and diseases which can cause sudden cardiac death in seemingly fit and healthy young people.

Since Joe's death in 2012, JHMT has campaigned tirelessly for greater understanding and awareness of SADS, as well as providing vital life-saving CPR training for schools and sports clubs.

The Trust also runs an awards scheme called Inspire aimed at helping young people to fulfill their potential by providing small grants for sporting, arts and community endeavours.

Steve Humphries, chair of JHMT, said: "Nick's efforts on behalf of our charity are simply fantastic. Not only is he completing a significant personal challenge, but with every step he takes along that 26.2mile route he'll be helping us to raise awareness of the dangers of undiagnosed heart conditions and diseases like SADS.

"These conditions claim the lives of 12 seemingly fit and healthy young people, aged 12-35 years old, every week in the UK, but these deaths are not inevitable. They're preventable.

"If more people – including young people of school age – knew how to start CPR and get a defibrillator to someone within a few minutes, we could really make a difference to those figures."

To find out more about the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust, please visit http://jhmt.org.uk/

To sponsor Nick, go to http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fundraiser-web/fundraiser/showFundraiserProfilePage.action?userUrl=NickWhite16.

Inspiring Lucy Gets £350 Award to Help Her Compete at Deaflympics

Inspiring Lucy Gets £350 Award to Help Her Compete at Deaflympics

A DEAF swimmer who has worked incredibly hard to compete despite her disability is one of the latest recipients of an Inspire Award.

Lucy Sharp, age 16, from Sileby, is a talented young sportswoman and has been selected to be a part of the Great Britain team for the Deaflympics, to be held in Turkey in July.

Inspire Awards are small grants handed out by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), to inspirational young people, helping them to fulfill their ambitions in sports, music, community enterprise and business.

Lucy – who swims with Loughborough Town Swimming Club – developed tinnitus around the time of her 13th birthday, and within a matter of months had lost her hearing completely. At the time she was an 'average level' swimmer at her club.

On becoming deaf, she lost a lot of confidence and experienced balance and co-ordination problems that caused her swimming to deteriorate.

Undeterred, she has striven to overcome her disability. Unable to hear the coaches, she worked with them to develop forms of communication to enable her to continue swimming in a mainstream setting and in the past year she has improved dramatically, surpassing her peers.

Lucy is at a distinct disadvantage against other swimmers at the start of 'able bodied' races because she has to look across to the starter for a hand signal or infrared light to start the race. This costs valuable time on the start, particularly in sprint racing, but in spite of this, Lucy broke the 50m freestyle club record for her age group last year and also currently holds national deaf age group records in 50m Backstroke and 50m Butterfly.

Recently, Lucy competed in the Great Britain Deaf Swimming Club national age group competition and came away with several gold medals.

Lucy said: "We have to raise our own funds to go as the deaf swimming team receives minimal funding. Each team member's cost is around £2,500.

"I'm working really hard to train for this event and am thrilled to have been given this amazing opportunity. The £350 Inspire Award will be a massive help as it will ease some of the financial burden and will enable me to concentrate on training."

Simon Taylor, Inspire Awards lead for the JHMT, said: "I can't imagine what it must have been like for Lucy to suddenly become deaf. It is remarkable how quickly she adapted to her new disability and she has worked very hard to achieve academic success as well as making dramatic improvements in her swimming.

"Lucy also has an older sister with physical and intellectual special needs. Throughout all her own troubles, Lucy has continued to 'look out' for her 19-year-old sister, going above and beyond the duties of a younger sibling. She is truly inspirational.

"Lucy's personal journey is an example to us all. The Inspire judges took particular delight in making this £350 award to someone who typifies what our awards scheme is all about."

Joe Humphries died from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome aged just 14 in October 2012, whilst out running near his family home in Rothley, Leicestershire. Since then, his family and friends have set up the JHMT and worked tirelessly to campaign for a better understanding of sudden, unexpected cardiac death in young people. They have campaigned for compulsory CPR training in schools and defibrillators in schools, community venues and sports clubs, as well as setting up the Inspire Awards.

To find out more about the work of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

May 2017
More than £1,000 Raised by this Year's Joe's Jog

More than £1,000 Raised by this Year's Joe's Jog

NEARLY 250 runners raised more than £1,000 for charity by joining a mile-long fun run to support the work of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

Joe's Jog, now in its fourth year, took place before the Mattioli Woods Rothley 10k running event on Tuesday 13 June. It drew a record 248 participants, with families and children of all ages enjoying the chance to be part of the Rothley 10k evening.

The race was opened by LCFC legend Alan Birchenall, who sounded the horn to set the racers off.

Joe's Jog was won by Ryan Elston, age 14, from Mountsorrel, in 5 minutes 18 seconds.

Second place went to 12-year-old Sean McCann, of Rothley, in 5 minutes 42 seconds, while third place was bagged by Samuel Pilbeam.

First female was 13-year-old Elodie Marsh, from Thurcaston, in 5 minutes 50 seconds.

Joe Humphries was 14 when he collapsed and died suddenly while out jogging near his Rothley home. He was a victim of SADS – sudden arrhythmic death syndrome – a heart condition which can strike anyone at any time, particularly otherwise fit and healthy young people.

Since Joe's death, his family and friends have worked tirelessly to raise awareness of SADS and sudden heart deaths. They set up the JHMT to provide free CPR training in schools, sports clubs and community groups, help fund community defibrillators and campaign for better understanding of SADS.

The charity also runs the Inspire Awards, a small grants scheme that helps inspiring young people to fulfill their potential.

Steve Humphries, chair of the JHMT, said: "This was, as ever, a fantastic event for families to run together over the mile distance, and we were blown away by the numbers – we had nearly double the number of runners we had last year.

"We raised £1,100 towards the work of the Trust, which is a wonderful tribute to Joe.

"Sudden heart deaths like Joe's aren't inevitable, they're preventable. If more people are CPR trained and more defibrillators are made available in public places, we can also make a difference to the shocking statistic that 12 young people aged 12-35 die in the UK each week from undiagnosed heart conditions like SADS.

"Joe's Jog is a great way to commemorate Joe in his home village, but it wouldn't be possible without the selfless efforts of the Trust's kind-hearted and talented volunteers, who are so willing to give up their precious time to help us organise this popular event."

To find out more about the Trust's work, to get involved as a volunteer, or to learn how to apply for the Inspire Awards or CPR training for your sports club, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

Photos of the Event: https://www.facebook.com/pg/JHMTorguk/photos/?tab=album&album_id=985945424880471 Event Results: http://jhmt.org.uk/events/2017/06/joes-jog-results

June 2017
Teamwork Saves Lives: Sileby Town CC & JHMT combine for CPR and Defibrillator training

Teamwork Saves Lives: Sileby Town CC & JHMT combine for CPR and Defibrillator training

Last Thursday (08/06/17) saw the first of two CPR and Defibrillator training events at Sileby Town CC in conjunction with Joe Humphries Memorial Trust.

Joe Humphries was 14 years old when he collapsed whilst jogging within 2 minutes of his home. The tragedy of losing a fit, healthy, vibrant and fun loving son and brother was made all the harder to bear when the very next day the family found that 12 fit and healthy young people die every week across the UK, with no prior symptoms or warning. This staggering, unacceptable statistic has inspired close family members and friends to set up 'The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust' (JHMT) so that Joe will not just become another statistic.

JHMT have worked closely with school sports organisations including Leicestershire County Cricket Club (LCCC) to train students and sportspeople in CPR and Defibrillator skills. The work with LCCC has helped train players, coaches and staff and there is now a drive to encourage Premier league clubs to house Defibrillators and be trained to provide the confidence to use CPR and defibrillators.

Sileby Town are now proud to announce that we house a defibrillator unit and are working with JHMT to train players and coaches to be prepared for events that may need these procedures to be administered. This evening our women and girls teams joined forces with some of our Under 19 squad to train and we have a second opportunity to undertake the training aimed at our senior players and coaches to up-skill lots of new people with the skills and confidence to provide a new workforce who can potentially help save a life.

Our second training event takes place on Thursday June 22nd 6:00pm.

http://www.silebytown.co.uk/stcc-jhmt-combine-cpr-defibrillator-training/

More photos from the event can be found on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/silebytowncc

Inspiring Six Share Out £1,000 in Inspire Awards

Inspiring Six Share Out £1,000 in Inspire Awards

A TEENAGER who wants to share her sewing skills with the community, a budding digital artist and four talented young sportspeople are among the latest recipients of an Inspire Award.

Callum Twelves, Tia Bhatt, Muhammad Ibraheem,Alma Unsudimi, Curtis Scothern and Daisy Platts have all received the awards – totalling £1,000 – which are handed out by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

Inspire Awards aim to help inspiring young people fulfill their ambitions by giving them small cash grants. The JHMT set up the scheme in memory of Joe Humphries, 14, who sadly never got to achieve his goals.

Joe died of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) while out jogging near his Rothley home. It's a heart condition that can affect anyone, at any time.

Racing cyclist Callum, 14, from Stapleton, will use his £150 Inspire Award to test his racing skills abroad, having already raced successfully in Belgium.

He said: "'The Inspire Award will contribute to my aim of winning the regional U14 road race championships in 2018, when I am at the top of my age category."

Tia Bhatt, 14, from Leicester, has been selected to represent England in an international rounders tournament in Guernsey. Her £200 Inspire Award will help offset some of the costs of her forthcoming trip.

"It means so much to me to represent my country at rounders," said Tia, who is also a member of the under-16s Leicester City women's football team. "Being able to compete at the highest level of your own sport is a great honour and will be a great experience for me."

Talented hockey player Muhammad, 14, from Stocking Farm in Leicester, has already been spotted and invited to attend an England hockey performance centre.

Muhammad said: "My £150 Inspire Awards grant means a great deal to me as I pursue my goal of representing England. Also, as I lost my sister in tragic circumstances, an Inspire grant makes her memory stay strong in me. My sister loved sport and I know she'd be proud of me."

Seventeen-year-old Alma Unsudimi, from Leicester, is very keen to pursue her ambition of becoming a fashion designer. Her current goal is to teach other young people in the community how to sew and develop their creative skills.

Alma will use her £150 Inspire Award to buy a new sewing machine. "This gives me no excuse to wait any longer in pursuing my dreams!" she said. "The Inspire grant makes me feel like somebody truly cares about me and wants to see me succeed."

Curtis Scothern, 16, from Wigston, is an aspiring digital artist. He works closely with local charity Soft Touch Arts, and says: The facilities at Soft Touch are great but I need a drawing tablet of my own so that I can continue my work in my spare time. I would like to share my skills with younger people at the Aspire Life Skills Learning Centre, where I go to paint." Now, thanks to a £150 Inspire Award, Curtis will be able to buy the equipment he needs.

Sixteen-year-old swimmer Daisy Platts, from Whetstone, will put her £200 Inspire Award towards the cost of a new racing suit, as well as towards the costs of competing up and down the country. Already a winner at the International Children's Games, Daisy has swum alongside Olympians and is a role model to others, recently beginning to teach very young swimmers.

"This grant will give me the me confidence and belief to push myself further, which in turn will help me reach the next level in my sport," she said.

Simon Taylor, Inspire Awards project lead for the JHMT, said: "The drive and determination of all these young people to succeed never ceases to amaze me. In some cases, they've overcome huge barriers to follow their goals – and in all cases, they're incredibly deserving of the support we can offer. I applaud them all and very much look forward to hearing about their future achievements."

To find out more about the JHMT and the Inspire Awards, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

July 2017
Leicester's Heart Friendly Parks

Leicester's Heart Friendly Parks

A NEW defibrillator is being installed at Abbey Park as part of the city council's commitment to create heart-friendly parks.

The defibrillator, at Abbey Park Visitor Centre, will join 2 others in Abbey Park and 28 in total installed across other parks in Leicester and achieves the end of phase one of an installation programme. Further units will be installed during the next year.

It's part of a £65,000 project, funded by the city council through a manifesto commitment, to ensure that automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are available in parks and green spaces across the city. Additional funding has also been received from the British Heart Foundation for an additional 5 units.

In many locations, the AEDs are located in a secure box on an exterior wall or other accessible location, so that they are available for community use whenever they are needed.

The city council is working in partnership with local charities The Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and Heartwize to provide free hands-on CPR training and AED familliarisation for staff, 'friends of' park groups, volunteers and members of the community.

Deputy city mayor Cllr Rory Palmer, who leads on health and wellbeing, said: "Providing more defibrillators in council-owned public spaces was a manifesto commitment of ours, because we recognise that having easy access to this equipment can mean the difference between life and death.

"I'm really pleased that we've been able to install so many of these units across the city so far, and we're continuing with a programme of installation to help make our parks and green spaces safer."

Dr Ffion Davies, medical lead for the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and consultant in emergency medicine at Leicester's hospitals, said:

"It's fantastic news to see another defibrillator going into a public place. Research shows that with the combination of immediate CPR and defibrillation within eight minutes of a person's heart stopping, their survival chances improve from 5% to 50%.

"In other countries, where defibrillators are as common as fire extinguishers, we see much better survival rates than in the UK. If anyone wants to learn CPR quickly, you can learn it from videos on the internet, and it only takes a minute to learn."

http://www.leicester.gov.uk/news/news-story-details/?nId=89254

More Life-Saving Equipment Installed at the LCCC - Fischer County Ground

More Life-Saving Equipment Installed at the LCCC - Fischer County Ground

A successful partnership between Leicestershire County Cricket Club (LCCC), the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) and HeartWize has allowed more life-saving equipment to be installed at the Fischer County Ground.

The JHMT, a local charity, works closely with sports organisations, including LCCC, to train students and sportspeople in CPR and defibrillator skills. A cardiac awareness day was held at the club in September 2016 for staff, players and the public, and a further session was held at the ground in January.

That session was to launch the Heart Aware Cricket (HAC) Scheme for clubs in Leicestershire and Rutland, a community project to reach out from LCCC to train and equip clubs in the event of sudden cardiac events.

The partnership has been inspired by the JHMT, which works tirelessly to raise awareness of sudden heart deaths following the death of Joe Humphries, aged just 14, from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) in 2012. SADS can strike anyone at any time, particularly otherwise fit and healthy young people.

Ahead of the ICC Women's World Cup opener between Pakistan and South Africa at Grace Road on Sunday, June 25, LCCC has recently installed further automated external defibrillators (AEDs).

LCCC now have seven AEDs with locations including the Morningside Pharmaceuticals Medical Centre, Charles Palmer Suite, the Mike Turner Cricket Centre (external wall) and the Curzon Road gate.

The new equipment will allow quicker access around the ground as well as allowing the public 24 hours access to the one situated at the main entrance on Curzon Road. The club also possess three AEDs that are mobile with the teams.

It is appropriate that the new automated external defibrillators AEDs have been installed ahead of the global tournament as JHMT and HeartWize have worked closely with women's cricket.

England international Sarah Taylor was the face of the Don't Get Caught Out - be prepared cricket poster which formed part of the JHMT's SADS Awareness Week campaign in 2015 to create heart-safe sport.

The England Women's Development squads also took part in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and AED familiarisation training in 2016. This was co-ordinated by former Leicestershire player and Head Coach Tim Boon and Loughborough MCCU Cricket Performance Manager & Women's Head Coach Salliann Briggs.

The partnership with JHMT, HeartWize and LCCC has also helped to drive an initiative in local clubs, which the women and girls teams at Sileby Town have been a part of. Leicestershire and Rutland Everards Premier League clubs are encouraged to house defibrillators and be trained to provide the confidence to use CPR and defibrillators.

Sileby Town were the first club to sign up to the HAC scheme to receive the training and get an AED on site, and their women and girls cricketers were involved in training sessions on the Thursdays of June 8 and 22.

Their women and girls teams joined forces with some of Sileby Town's under 19 squad to undertake training, the purpose of which is to provide lots of new people with the skills and confidence to potentially help save a life in the future.

Rob Leather, Head of Player Support and Head of Physiotherapy at Leicestershire CCC said: "It has been fantastic to work with Steve and the JHMT on this initiative. Leicestershire County Cricket Club are proud to be leading the way and encouraging local clubs to join up, and the additional equipment at the ground is vital in helping to create the safest possible environment."

Steve Humphries, chair of the JHMT, said: "We're so pleased to be working with LCCC, local cricket clubs, women's cricket teams and Heartwize to ensure that local cricketers can play and compete in a heart safe environment.

"Already, LCCC's Heart Awareness Cricket programme has started to make some headway into raising the standards of 'heart care' at both the professional and community levels of the game so all members of the cricketing community can play in the safest possible environment. Together, we must keep spreading the message that sudden heart deaths aren't inevitable, they're preventable.

"We'll continue to work to raise the standards of heart care across all levels of sport as sudden cardiac arrest is unpredictable and can strike anyone, anyplace and anytime without any warning, including seemingly fit and healthy young people aged 12-35. It's vitally important that community sports clubs are ready, prepared and equipped to deal with a cardiac emergency. After all, it could mean the difference between life and death."

http://www.leicestershireccc.co.uk/news/2017/june/more-life-saving-equipment-installed.html

News article courtesy of:

Dan Nice, Communications Manager, Leicestershire County Cricket Club

Cricket Club leading the Way in Being Heartsafe Thanks to Training from Local Charity

Cricket Club leading the Way in Being Heartsafe Thanks to Training from Local Charity

A LOCAL cricket club has taken part in CPR and defibrillator training to make sure as many of its members as possible know what it means to be heartsafe.

Rothley Park Cricket Club, one of the leading advocates of the Leicestershire Heart Awareness in Cricket programme, invited specialist volunteers from local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) to come and deliver the training to players and club staff.

Heart Awareness in Cricket is a collaboration between Leicestershire County Cricket Club, JHMT and Heartwize, and aims to provide all Leicestershire Everards Premier League clubs with dedicated support, advice and guidance so that they can access funding to secure a defibrillator, external cabinet and training to help prevent sudden heart deaths.

Those learning the vital life-saving skills included former England, Leicestershire and Lancashire county cricketer Philip DeFreitas, who is head coach for the Rothley club.

Philip said: "It's really important that all players have the knowledge and understanding to provide CPR to other team members should it be required – even though hopefully, it won't be needed.

"All players, whatever their age, should know the drill – that you contact the emergency services, use a defib and commence CPR. We all need to be prepared."

Steve Thomason from the club added: "We've had a defibrillator available for more than a year now, and we are proud to be ambassadors for Heart Awareness in Cricket, which is encouraging other Leicestershire cricket clubs to get defibrillators and learn how they could help to prevent sudden heart deaths.

"Over the winter, we've had a new pavilion built, so we now have the defibrillator located on the outside of this. The extra space provided by our new facilities also gave us the ideal chance to do some training. We hope to have even more training on offer for coaches and other players later in the year."

The thriving club – which has more than 100 youngsters in its junior section – has strong links with the JHMT, as the charity is based in the same village. Over the past few years, the cricket club has raised money for the JHMT through its annual Party in the Park community fund-raising event.

This year's Party in the Park takes place at the club on Sunday 27 August, from noon, with free admission.

JHMT medical lead and former intensive care consultant Dr Mike Ferguson, who delivered the training, said: "JHMT has been working closely with Rothley Park Cricket Club to help them set up their public access defibrillator, including supplying a £600 grant for the defibrillator box, so that it's accessible to the local community 24/7.

"I was delighted to deliver the free, hands-on CPR and defibrillator familiarisation training as part of the heart awareness In Cricket programme. Providing this sort of advice, expertise and support is exactly what the JHMT is all about."

The JHMT offers free training to sports clubs across the city and county, in an effort to ensure that as many people as possible know how to save a life if an emergency occurs.

It also works to promote awareness of sudden heart deaths, after the death from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) of Rothley lad Joe Humphries, in 2012, aged just 14.

To find out more about the JHMT or enquire about training for your club, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

You can also follow the Trust on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/jhmtorguk or @jhmt.org.uk

August 2017
Special Olympics GB Athletes get a Boost from JHMT's Inspire Awards

Special Olympics GB Athletes get a Boost from JHMT's Inspire Awards

TWO young people from Leicestershire who are competing at this year's Special Olympics GB National Games have been awarded grants from a local charity to help them fulfill their sporting ambitions.

Swimmer Laura Sharp, from Sileby, and tennis player Matthew Chilvers, from Broughton Astley, are among around 2,600 athletes heading for the largest sports event to take place in Great Britain for people with an intellectual (learning) disability.

The Games take place in Sheffield from 7-12 August, giving all athletes who take part the chance to achieve their ambitions and demonstrate their abilities to the community.

And local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT) has stepped in to help both Laura and Matthew get to the Games.

The JHMT runs the Inspire Awards, a small grants scheme that helps inspiring young people fulfill their ambitions by giving them cash grants. The JHMT set up the scheme in memory of Joe Humphries, 14, who sadly died of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) while out jogging near his Rothley home.

Nineteen-year-old Laura has competed previously in two Special Olympics Summer Games as a gymnast, including at the games in Leicester 2009. The time round, Laura – who has a learning disability and autism – will be competing as a swimmer.

One of the biggest barriers to overcome for Special Olympics GB athletes is raising the required funds, plus attending training events and other competitions to prepare for the games. Laura's £200 Inspire Award will help her to meet these costs.

Samantha Sharp, Laura's mum, said: "The games have given Laura a chance to compete on a level playing field but also, more importantly, given her confidence, determination and friendships that will last a lifetime."

Simon Taylor, Inspire Awards project lead, said: "Laura is an inspiration to us all given that she will now have represented our region in two very demanding sports, with rigorous requirements for training and levels of personal commitment. We wish her well and look forward to hearing from her after the event."

Matthew Chilvers, 21, has been preparing for the Special Olympics GB National Games by competing in regional tennis tournaments across the country. He trains in a group with the men's team at Desford and with the East Midlands Special Olympics Squad in Nottingham.

His £200 Inspire Award helped him travel to compete, and to have extra one-to-one coaching which in turn boosted his skills and confidence.

Matthew said: "Having the opportunity to make improvements each week meant I felt well prepared going into the Special Olympics. The Special Olympics motto is 'Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.' The Inspire Award helped me to train as hard as I could to do my best in Sheffield.

"It is also good for other people with learning disabilities to see people taking part in the Special Olympics GB National Games. It shows people in a positive light and might encourage other people with learning disabilities to get into sport."

Simon Taylor, Inspire Awards project lead, said: "We gave this award to Matthew as he is a great example to other young people through his ambition and commitment to succeed. We look forward to hearing from him following the Special Olympics tournament."

The Inspire Awards are all about helping talented young people to fulfil their ambitions, whether their area of interest is sport, art, entrepreneurism or community activities. To find out more, visit www.jhmt.org.uk/inspire

JHMT Helps Put Cardiac Health on National Sports Agenda

JHMT Helps Put Cardiac Health on National Sports Agenda

The independent Duty of Care in Sport review, which was led by Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, advocates more training and better awareness of cardiac health to help protect people – especially young people – who play sport.

The recommendations set out in the report, which was commissioned by the Government, cover areas including safeguarding, mental welfare and equality, diversity and inclusion.

A section on safety, injury and medical issues has been particularly welcomed by local heart charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), which has been lobbying for better understanding of conditions like sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS).

It highlights the need for a greater all-round knowledge about heart conditions and symptoms that could lead to sudden cardiac arrest in sport.

The report also calls for more information and awareness about cardiac screening and for more club members to have basic hands-on CPR training and access to a defibrillator.

To help accelerate these heart safe standards in sport, the report says all new sports facilities funded by Government grants should include a defibrillator when they are built. It should be available to the construction crew, before being passed on to be used on-site as a publicly accessible defibrillator.

Chair of the JHMT, Steve Humphries, said: "We were delighted to have an input into this report about the importance of cardiac safety for all young people who play sport – from elite athletes to first-time participants, whether on or off the field. Spectators, too, deserve the same level of cardiac safety.

"This report seeks to embed the provision of defibrillators in new sports facilities and recognises that all those responsible for the health and welfare of young people participating in sport need to be better informed about specific symptoms that can lead to cardiac arrest.

"This is long overdue. Joe's Trust has demonstrated over some considerable time that education, awareness, CPR skills and quick access to a defibrillator are key to increasing the chances of survival in the event of a cardiac emergency."

The JHMT offers free training in CPR and how to operate a defibrillator for sports clubs. It also helps to provide funding for defibrillators to be fitted in places where they can be accessed by the public at all times.

Dr Ffion Davies, medical lead for the Trust and a consultant in A&E at Leicester's hospitals, said: "It is very encouraging that the Government has published guidance about sports safety, and the importance of preventing deaths from SADS conditions. It is good to see mention of CPR training and the availability of defibrillator machines for public use."

Mike Ferguson, consultant at UHL and Trustee of JHMT, said: "JHMT has always supported the concept of increased awareness of possible cardiac death, how to deal with such an emergency and the need for targeted screening. We will continue to teach CPR and defibrillator familiarity within sport and increase the number of sports facilities and clubs that have access to defibrillators 24/7."

Baroness Tanni-Grey Thompson is one of the UK's most successful athletes. She competed at five Paralympic Games, winning 16 medals, held over 30 world records and won the London Marathon six times between 1992 and 2002. She became a life peer in the House of Lords in 2010.

She said: "'I would like to thank the Trust for the information that they submitted to the review. Sport is a wonderful thing to be involved in, but it's important to ensure all people play in the safest possible environment. There is still much to do in terms of raising awareness and standards for a wide variety of issues around duty of care in sport."

To read the full report, visit https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/duty-of-care-in-sport-review

Joe Humphries died from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome aged just 14 in October 2012, whilst out running near his family home in Rothley, Leicestershire. Since then, his family and friends have worked tirelessly to campaign for a better understanding of sudden, unexpected cardiac death in young people, and have campaigned for compulsory CPR training in schools and defibrillators in schools, community venues and sports clubs.

To find out more about the work of the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

Ruffle the Rail Dog and his lifesaving message help to launch this year’s SADS Awareness Week

Ruffle the Rail Dog and his lifesaving message help to launch this year’s SADS Awareness Week

A CHILDREN'S story featuring a friendly dog who helps to save a life will launch this year's SADS Awareness Week.

The story of Ruffle the Life Saver is the latest in the adventures of Ruffle the Rail Dog, a series of books written and illustrated by local author Rachel Greaves.

Rachel has written and illustrated the story in association with local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT), which will donate copies of the book to every primary school in the city and county to mark SADS Awareness Week.

SADS Awareness Week runs from 2-8 October and is the JHMT's annual week of activity to promote its important work campaigning for better understanding and recognition of SADS – sudden arrhythmic death syndrome – and other heart conditions which can strike very suddenly, particularly in seemingly fit and healthy young people between 12 – 35 years old.

This year, as part of SADS Awareness Week, the JHMT will be showing how even very young children can help to save a life in the event of a cardiac emergency – either by raising the alarm or, in the case of older primary school children, learning CPR skills.

Lauren Humphries from the JHMT said: "Ruffle's story is ideal for helping us to spread the message that no matter what age, everyone can play their part to save in case of a cardiac emergency.

"In the story, Ruffle raises the alarm – just as younger children can do – when he sees someone collapse in suspected cardiac arrest. The book then shows how people use their CPR and defibrillator skills to revive the victim, so that he is breathing by the time the ambulance arrives.

"Stories like this one normalise defibrillator and CPR training, which is exactly what we want for the next generation."

To mark the launch of SADS Week, on Monday 2 October the JHMT will be releasing balloons at Woodstock Primary School in Leicester, as well as training staff and pupils at the school in vital lifesaving skills.

Author Rachel Greaves will also be on hand with her Ruffle the Rail Dog puppet and pupils will be shown a film introducing the story.

Rachel said: "I feel very humbled and pleased to think that my creation of Ruffle could be used to potentially help save lives".

The JHMT will organise for copies of Ruffle the Life Saver to be sent to all city and county primary schools to help raise awareness of the importance of CPR and defibrillator training.

SADS Awareness Week will include a full programme of community CPR training sessions and specialist talks conducted by the JHMT's medical professionals. To find out more, take a look around the website or check out @jhmtorguk on Twitter and facebook.com/jhmtorguk

To view the Ruffle the Life Saver film online, visit jhmt.org.uk/cpr

September 2017
Alan Teaches Life-Saving Skills to More than 1,000 People

Alan Teaches Life-Saving Skills to More than 1,000 People

A CHARITY volunteer who has devoted four years to training people in vital lifesaving skills has now taught more than 1,000 people.

Retired cardiac nurse Alan Harrison-White is a vital member of the JHMT team, putting his skills to use for local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust.

The JHMT was set up was set up in memory of Rothley teenager Joe Humphries, who collapsed and tragically died from SADS – sudden arrhythmic death syndrome – in October 2012, while he was out jogging.

Since that time, the charity's dedicated fundraisers, volunteers and medical leads have worked tirelessly to increase the number of public-access defibrillators available across the city and county.

They have also worked to increase awareness of sudden heart deaths and – crucially – to ensure as many people as possible are trained in CPR and how to use a defibrillator.

Alan, 60, from Mountsorrel, said: "Because we do the training in groups, I can't pinpoint exactly who the 1,000th person I trained was, but I know it will be someone from the 12/74 Scouts in Mere Road, Leicester, where I did some training recently.

"I started doing the CPR training for the charity on the 3 September 2013, when I trained members of the local community in Rothley. Since then I've delivered training at sports clubs, community venues and schools at all levels including proudly representing Joe's Trust as part of the Leicestershire Heartwize schools programme, a unique collaboration between key agencies to create a new generation of lifesavers across the region."

The JHMT training sessions – which are all free – can be arranged through the charity's website jhmt.org.uk, and Alan says news is often spread about the sessions by word-of-mouth, too.

Chair of the JHMT Steve Humphries said: "This is a fantastic achievement and we're so grateful to Alan for his dedication and determination in getting the message out there – that sudden cardiac death isn't inevitable, it's preventable.

"We can have a positive impact on the shocking statistics around sudden heart death. We need to make more people aware of the symptoms of undiagnosed conditions like SADS, train more people in basic CPR lifesaving skills and place more defibrillators in our communities, taking the fear out if using them.

"Currently less than 10% of people survive an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the UK, but with effective CPR and defibrillation within 3-5 minutes of collapse, survival rates can be as high as 50–70%."

Alan added: "I chose to go into cardiac nursing as it was a field of nursing that interested me and was very much hands-on regarding patient care. I worked as a cardiac nurse for 25 years – 15 on the coronary care unit at Leicester General Hospital, and then at the LRI A&E department as a cardiac specialist nurse.

"I really enjoy teaching these skills to people, as one day they may help them to save a life."

To find out more about the JHMT, including how to book a training session for your sports club or community group, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

October 2017
Budding Karate Champs Benefit from Inspire Awards

Budding Karate Champs Benefit from Inspire Awards

TWO inspiring young people from Leicestershire are travelling to Tenerife this week to take part in the junior world karate championships.

And their journey has been aided by Inspire Awards totalling £600 provided by local charity the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust (JHMT).

Seventeen-year-old Dylan Traves, from Measham, and his 15-year-old brother Aron, have both been selected by the English Karate Federation to represent England in the competition. Both are members of Measham Karate Club, where their dad, Rob, is a coach.

Aron will be competing in the Male Cadets 14-15 years individual kata event. Dylan will be competing in the team kata event, along with Aron.

Aron said: "Every bit of support is so important to me and my brother. We have to find funds for travel and accommodation for all the training and competitions we take part in across the country and Europe.

"Our JHMT Inspire Award grants will really help us as we put the finishing touches to our final preparations in readiness to represent England at the world championships."

Coach Rob Traves said: "Aron, Dylan and fellow club member Anthony Sempebwa have been training hard over the years to get to this point and their dedication, determination and perseverance is a fantastic example to all the students at the club."

Inspire Awards are small grants handed out to local young people aged 13-21 to help them fulfill their ambitions in the field of sports, art, entrepreneurism or community projects.

The were set up in memory of Joe Humphries, who sadly never got to fulfill his ambitions. Joe died in October 2012, while out jogging near his Rothley home.

He was the victim of SADS – sudden arrhythmic death syndrome – a sudden heart condition which can affect anyone, even otherwise seemingly fit and healthy young people.

The JHMT was set up to fight SADS and other sudden heart conditions, which take the lives of 12 young people in the UK every week.

As well as running the Inspire Awards, the charity campaigns for a better understanding of SADS and helps train local sports clubs and community groups in CPR and defibrillator training. It also helps to provide funding for community-access defibrillators and aims to keep sudden heart deaths on the agenda with medical and sports professionals.

Simon Taylor, the JHMT's Inspire Awards lead, said: "It's fantastic to be able to play a part in Dylan and Aron's journey to the junior world karate championships by providing them with Inspire Awards. We wish them every success – I'm sure their commitment and dedication to their sport will pay off."

Measham Karate Club is affiliated to the England Karate Federation and has around 650 members, aged between six and 50. They train three evenings a week – to find out more, visit www.meashamkarateclub.co.uk

To find out more about the Joe Humphries Memorial Trust and the Inspire Awards, visit www.jhmt.org.uk

De Montfort University hosts Leicestershire's 'Restart A Heart Day'

De Montfort University hosts Leicestershire's 'Restart A Heart Day'

More than 100 students, staff and members of the local community have been trained to save lives thanks to De Montfort Students' Union (DSU)'s unique partnership with a Leicestershire charity.

More than 100 students, staff and members of the local community have been trained to save lives thanks to De Montfort Students' Union (DSU)'s unique partnership with a Leicestershire charity.

Kasabian star Chris Edwards learnt basic CPR at Wednesday's 'Restart A Heart Day' in the Campus Centre, as delivered by the East Midlands Ambulance Service (EMAS) and HeartWize programme.

All those who attended learned a valuable life skill and were presented with a certificate.

Just over 24 hours later, students then dived deeper into the context behind SADS, and what we can do to prevent the more than 600 deaths related deaths in young people each year.

The Thursday evening talk was opened by long time JHMT patron and England's Rugby World Cup-winning captain, Martin Johnson.

He said: "It's been five years now since we lost Joe, but this issue isn't going away.

"It can happen to anyone at any time, and so the Trust is all about raising awareness and getting training for people to understand what they need to do.

"You'll see hundreds of fire extinguishers walking around here, and we want defibrillators to be as common as that.

"CPR is something anyone can learn really quickly; modern defibrillators even talk to you to tell you what to do. It really is a no-brainer."

Joe's father Steve Humphries told the audience: "We have 30,000 cardiac arrests [a year] in the UK that are witnessed by other people, and less than 10% of those people survive.

"Other countries are steaming ahead of us; but we can all make that difference. You've got the answers, you can help.

"Ultimately, we will get a heartsafe community; it's happening. But we need to contribute towards that now, because ultimately, what price do you put on a life?"

The Campus Centre became home to the first public access defibrillator on the DMU campus back in April this year, when we unveiled the lifesaving equipment in partnership with JHMT. You can read more here.

Read More: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/news/2017/october/rugby-world-cup-winner-speaks-at-dmu-about-sads.aspx http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/news/2017/october/kasabian-star-visits-dmu-to-support-sads-awareness-week.aspx

Balloon launch, book, talks and training sessions mark this year’s JHMT SADS Awareness Week

Balloon launch, book, talks and training sessions mark this year’s JHMT SADS Awareness Week

A LOCAL charity is holding an awareness-raising week of activities to help promote better understanding of sudden heart deaths.

SADS Awareness Week will take place from 2-6 October 2017.

The JHMT was set up after the death of Rothley teenager Joe Humphries in 2012. Joe died from SADS while out on a training jog near his home. SADS stands for sudden arrhythmic death syndrome, a collective term for a group of deadly genetic heart conditions which cause a disturbance with the heart rhythm and can lead to sudden cardiac arrest.

On Monday 2 October, SADS Week kicks off with a launch event at Woodstock Primary Academy in Leicester. Children will have a special assembly where they will meet Ruffle the Rail Dog, the creation of local author Rachel Greaves. Ruffle is the star of Ruffle The Life Saver, a new book and film about CPR training and to mark SADS Week, the JHMT is donating a copy of the book to every city and county primary school.

There will also be a balloon launch at the school to get SADS Week off to a flying start. On Wednesday 4 October, at De Montfort University, the students' union will be hosting Leicestershire's 'Restart A Heart Day' as part of SADS Week.

Students and staff will be invited to learn CPR and how to use a defibrillator in the students' union building. The event will be open anyone passing by, with training delivered by East Midlands Ambulance Service, Community First Responders and JHMT. On the same day, CPR training will take place for students at Stephenson College, in Coalville. And at De Lisle College, which was Joe's school, Joe's annual photography competition will be launched, which encourages the talents of De Lisle students and is held in memory of Joe and his passion for arts.

On Thursday 5 October, at De Montfort University's Hugh Aston building, another of the week's SADS talks will take place. Led by Dr Ffion Davies, consultant in A&E and JHMT's SADS expert, the session will examine SADS and its implications for those who participate in physical activities. There will also be feedback from other local heartsafe initiatives, including Leicester City Council's Heart Friendly Parks scheme and Leicestershire County Cricket Club's Heart Awareness Cricket project, both of which run in conjunction with JHMT. The talk starts at 5.30pm and is open to all students, staff, and members of the community. For further details, call 0116 366 4813 or email: abigail.battisto@dmu.ac.uk

JHMT patron and rugby legend Martin Johnson, who will open the Thursday talk, said:

"Once again, SADS Week is a timely reminder for us all of the importance of people having basic CPR life-saving skills and knowing how to use a defibrillator.

"What a bystander does or does not do in those vital few seconds and minutes following a collapse can be the difference between surviving or not. Every year in the UK, there are 27,000 potentially survivable sudden cardiac deaths. Simple skills really do save lives and CPR can buy vital time."

JHMT medical lead and consultant in emergency medicine at Leicester's hospitals, Dr Ffion Davies, said:

"It's great to see that year on year the JHMT increases SADS awareness amongst healthcare professionals in Leicestershire, and promotes CPR training and defibrillator familiarity amongst more and more local sports organisations, schools and members of the public. This will save lives."

Rounding off the week, on Friday 6 October, there will be a Heart Friendly Parks training session at Abbey Park's education centre, starting at 10am. To find out more, email parks@leicester.gov.uk

You can also follow SADS Awareness Week events and activities on Facebook and Twitter: facebook.com/jhmtorguk or @jhmt.org.uk and on the JHMT website at jhmt.org.uk/sads-week-2017